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How to Resize Weaving Patterns by Amanda Rataj

How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

Hello weavers! 

Today I’m going to talk about how to adjust a weaving pattern to fit your loom. Resizing and adjusting a pattern to fit your loom’s width just takes a pencil, a bit of paper, and (if you’re like me) a calculator to help you successfully adapt the project.

As examples, I’m going to use the two projects I’ve designed for GIST (Tidal Towels & Squarish Rug) as examples, along with the Textured Cotton Scarf. Regardless of whether you’re weaving on a rigid heddle or harness loom, I feel that adjusting a weaving pattern to fit your loom can be broken down into 3 steps:

  1. Gather project details
  2. Calculate shrinkage
  3. Adjust the pattern 

Make a Pattern Wider ~ The Basics

Let’s say you’d like to weave my Squarish Rug - it has a width at reed of 21”, but you’d like to make the rug a bit wider.

First you’ll need to collect some information about your original pattern: the width at reed, finished width, and EPI. Then decide what your new width is going to be.

  • Width at reed: 21”
  • Finished width: 19”
  • EPI: 15
  • New width: 28” 
How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

I first use those numbers to find out what the percent that the project shrunk width-wise. To do this, divide the finished width by the width at reed: 

  • 19 / 21 = .90

That means the finished width is 90% the size of the reeding width - or that it shrunk 10%

Armed with this information, I can now apply that shrinkage rate to to my new width (28”) to find out how many inches my new project will be in the reed.

  • 28” * .10 = 2.8” of shrinkage
  • 28” + 2.8” = 30.8” new width at reed

Next, multiply the your new width at reed by the sett (15 epi) to determine the amount of warp ends. 

  • 30.8” * 15EPI = 462 ends needed

This is the basic math that you need to adjust a plain weave pattern without more complex details such as stripes or other pattern blocks. 

Make a Pattern Wider ~ The Details

How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

Now we have rough idea of how many ends we’ll need to get a finished width of 28” and we can move on to the next step - adjusting the pattern. 

The Squarish Rug is woven in plain weave, so there’s not anything special I need to do to adjust the threading, but by examining the pattern, I can see that it’s made up of three different sections: a border, a square, and a space between those squares. (See photo above for reference). Each of those sections is made up of a certain number of ends, so the next thing I’ll do is figure out how many inches each section represents: 

  • Border: 18 ends / 15 EPI = 1.2”
  • Square: 52 ends / 15 EPI = 3.4”
  • Space: 24 ends / 15 EPI = 1.6”

The original rug has 4 squares separated by 3 spacers, with 2 borders. Added together, each square/spacer combo equals 5”

To adjust this pattern to fit my new width, I can add two squares (104 ends) and two spacers (48) to the pattern for a total of 152 ends, or 10.1”. As you can see on my drawing below, I write out each block and how many ends and inches it represents, and then I’ll add up all those numbers to figure out how many ends and inches the new project will be - 30.8” or 468 ends, pretty much exactly the amount I calculated earlier to get a finished size of 28”.

How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

I was lucky there, but what if your pattern doesn’t divide as nicely? When adjusting weaving patterns to fit my loom, I usually treat my numbers as an average and aim for something in that range, give or take about an inch to either side (15 ends in this case). You can always add or subtract ends from the border, the square, or the space as well, not just the size of the project as a whole. The same math and theories work for making a pattern more narrow as well.

Make a Pattern Narrower

Let’s say you'd like to weave the Textured Cotton Scarf, which has a width at reed of 14”, but you need to make it narrower to fit your loom. The same math applies as when adjusting to make your pattern wider - first step, collect your information: 

  • Width at reed: 14”
  • Finished width: 11.5”
  • EPI: 12

To figure out how many ends you need, simply multiple the ends-per-inch by your loom’s width weaving width: 

  • 12 EPI x 9” (new width at reed) = 108 ends

You can also calculate the shrinkage if you’d like to know approximately how wide your finished scarf will be.  First divide the finished width of the original scarf by the width at reed of the original scarf:

  • 11.5" / 14"  = .82 

That means the finished width is 82% the size of the width at reed - a shrinkage rate of 18%. 

Next, multiply your adjusted width at reed by this percentage (.18) to find out how many inches your scarf will shrink:

  • 9" (new width at reed)* .18 = 1.6” shrinkage 

Then subtract 1.6" from your adjusted width at reed to approximate how wide your scarf will be:

  • 9" - 1.6" = 7.4" finished width

Adjust a Weaving Draft

Adjusting a four harness weaving pattern follows the same formula, but with a closer look at the way the pattern itself repeats. We’re going to look at my Tidal Towels as an example.

The Tidal Towels have a width at reed of 16.9” and a finished size of 15.5” - which is approximately 9% shrinkage (following the same formula used previously). They’re sett at 20 EPI. 

I can see that the pattern is made up of 3 different sections:

  • Border: 27 ends / 20 = 1.35”
  • Wave pattern: 22 ends = 1.1”
  • Transition: 2 ends = .1”

If there’s a repeating pattern in a weave, I like to look for the beginning and end of the repeat - in the Tidal Towels, the repeat starts on harness 3 and ends on harness 4 - I’ve made a rectangular box around the repeat in the following image so that you can see it. This repeat is 22 ends long. 

How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

Lets take a closer look at that repeat. It has two parts to it - the first 11 ends create the downward wave, and are mostly on shafts 1 and 2, while the last 11 ends make the rising wave and are on 3 and 4. Across the width of the pattern, the complete wave is repeated 12 times and is balanced out by repeating the first 11 ends of the pattern (the downward wave). 

A complete wave is 22 ends, which is almost exactly an inch - making it really easy to add or subtract to the width of the project. If I’m widening the towels, I could increase the number of times I do the wave repeat by adding 22 ends (or 1”) until I reach a size I like. I could also add or subtract ends from the border section - it’s plain twill, going either 1-2-3-4 or 4-3-2-1, so it would be easy to add or subtract ends. Because we know that this project is sett at 20 epi, we can figure out that 5 ends = 1/4”, making it easy to adjust the borders by small amounts. 

How to Resize Weaving Patterns for Rigid Heddle and Multi-Harness Looms

Final Thoughts

Another way you can look at adjusting weaving patterns is by adjusting parts of the patterns themselves - in my Tidal Towels, for example, once you see how the pattern repeats, you could elongate or shorten the waves by adding ends in the middle of each wave - in the downwards wave by adding/subtracting two threads on shafts 2 and 1. This is where adjusting weaving patterns gets creative - you can quickly change the balance of a motif and end up with something entirely new. Keeping proportion in mind is key!

Another way to adjust a weaving pattern is by using different materials or setting it closer or farther apart. In the Squarish Rug, I offer suggestions in the pattern for changing the height of the loops by using a smaller knitting needle, but you could also try a different yarn or a blend of two or more threads. When you start adjusting patterns in this way, the formula can help - but only to a point. To get accurate adjustments, you’ll have to make samples and take measurements.

When it comes to weaving, there are very few set-in-stone rules - I feel that if you’re achieving results that you like using your method, then keep doing it that way! This way of figuring out how to adjust weaving patterns to fit your loom is the way I would do it - it suits the way I see and interpret patterns. I’m sure there are different ways to arrive at the same result though, so make samples, play with your weaving, and develop a process that works for you. Do you have a good method for adjusting weaving patterns? Let us know! 

About Amanda Rataj

Amanda Rataj is an artist and weaver living and working in Hamilton, Ontario. She studied at the Ontario College of Art and Design University and has developed her contemporary craft practice through research-based projects, artist residencies, professional exhibitions, and lectures. Her textile focus of the material and conceptual nature of vernacular, everyday objects used for the home and body; her work (and weaving patterns) are available at her website, and at Guildworks, or by commission. 



July 27, 2020 — Amanda Rataj

Color-and-Weave Towels

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

Color-and-Weave Towels

Color-and-Weave is a simple plain weave technique that utilizes a specific color order in the warp and weft to create a seemingly intricate pattern. These towels are woven with Mallo Cotton Slub in two contrasting shades of blue.

Pattern by Jenny Sennott, woven by Elizabeth Springett for GIST: Yarn & Fiber

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 2 cones of Mallo Cotton Slub (1/2 lb cones, 1,500 yd/lb) in contrasting colors, shown here in Icicle and Eclipse

Kits: Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave a set of 2 towels that measure ~16" W x 31.5" L after washing and hemming.

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: Rigid heddle loom at least 20" wide, or 2-4 shaft table or floor loom, 12 or 12.5 dent reed, 2 boat shuttles & bobbins or 2 stick shuttles
  • EPI: 12 
  • PPI: ~12
  • Width at Reed: 18" 
  • Warp Ends: 216
  • Warp Length: 2.8 yards (100"), includes 24" of loom waste and 20% for shrinkage
  • Draft: Tabby (plain weave), color-and-weave        
  • Total warp yarn used: ~608 yards
  • Total weft yarn used: ~670 yards
  • Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 35"
  • Finished Dimensions: 2 towels that measure ~16" W x 31.5" L each after washing and hemming
  • Finishing Details: Hand sewn rolled hem         
  • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold, tumble dry low, press as needed

Instructions

1. Warp the loom using your preferred method (direct or indirect) with a total of 216 warp ends, 2.8 yards long, following the warp color order below. Center for a weaving width of 18" and sley 1 end per hole and slot in a 12 or 12.5 dent heddle on a rigid heddle loom. If you are using a multi-shaft loom, thread for plain weave and sley 1 end per dent in a 12 dent reed. 

Warp Color Order: D D D L D D D L L L L (19 repeats, 209 ends), end with D D D L D D D for a total of 216 ends

2. Weave following the weft color order below. Each towel should measure approximately 35” long in loom to account for shrinkage and hems. Weave with scrap yarn for a few picks in between each towel. 

Weft Color Order: D D D L D L D L 

3. Cut the fabric off the loom and zig zag the raw edges. Machine wash cold and tumble dry low. Cut the towels apart at scrap yarn maker. Turn edges 1/4” twice for rolled hems, and press. Stitch hems by hand or by machine.

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

About Jenny Sennott

Jenny Sennott is a weaver and weaving teacher in mid-Missouri. Her favorite source of inspiration for her weaving is the world of nature. She has taught weaving to people of all ages and abilities for over 30 years at Access Arts in Columbia, MO, and is continually inspired by the weaving explorations of her students.



July 23, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

Free Pattern to Weave these Silk Noil Neck Scarves

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Flourish Silk Noil Neck Scarves

*Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

Soft, textured, and oh so simple. These elegant silk noil neck scarves by Emma Rhodes are designed to be woven on a floor loom OR a rigid heddle loom. Our Treenway 10/2 Undyed Silk Noil and Japanese Silk Noil yarns weave together beautifully and become even softer after washing and wearing. Whip up this silky duo over the weekend and wear them on your neck, wrist, hair, or purse. Below you will find all the instructions and materials needed to make a pair of neck ties to complement your wardrobe. 

Materials 

Warp: 1 skein of un-dyed Treenway 10/2 Silk Noil

Weft: 2 cones of Japanese Silk Noil 

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Project Notes

  • Tools required: 2-4 shaft loom or rigid heddle loom12 dent reedboat shuttle or stick shuttle
  • Structure: Plain weave 
  • EPI: 12 
  • Width at reed: 4.5"
  • Warp ends: 56
  • Warp length: ~113" (3.1 yards) 
  • Length measured under tension at loom: Each scarf should measure about 40-43" under tension. Make sure to weave about 1/2" - 1" with scrap yarn at the beginning and end of each scarf for spacing. 
  • Finished dimensions: 2 neck scarves that measure approximately 4" wide by 36-40" long (depending on personal preference) 
  • Finishing details: Machine stitched frayed edge (or hand stitched if you prefer)
  • Care instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent and air dry, press and steam as needed
                 
                 

Pattern & Sewing Instructions 

Emma writes: "Weave each scarf to about 43" under tension (and make sure to weave with scrap yarn for 1/2"-1" at the beginning and the end of each). I chose to make each a solid color but you can also experiment with stripes and color blocks. Once you have finished weaving follow these finishing instructions and reference the photos below:

  1. Cut scarves apart in the center of the scrap yarn spacer. 
  2. Fold one end over on the diagonal so that it creates a triangle. I lined up the edge of the scarf with the selvedge to make sure it was square. 
  3. Cut along the crease to create a raw diagonal edge.
  4. Set up your sewing machine for a fairly small stitch. I set mine to about a 4 on the dial and adjusted the tension accordingly. Do some tests on the scraps of fabric cut from the ends of the scarf.
  5. Line up your raw edge on the 3/8" hem line on your sewing machine. Straight stitch down the diagonal edge. Use back stitch at the beginning and end to secure the stitches. 
  6. Trim the raw edge a bit closer to the stitched line and fluff the fringe a bit to bring out the frayed edge. The stitches are hardly noticeable. Repeat on each edge for both scarves. 
  7. Wash and air dry your scarves. Press with a warm iron and lots of steam. I found that washing and ironing made a huge difference in the softness of the fabric."
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
     
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
   
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Brooks Bouquet Curtains 

*Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

Weave an elegant pair of curtains designed by Erin Supinski for her Brooklyn home. These curtains are woven with a few of our favorite undyed yarns including Silk / Ramie10/2 Silk Noil, and Fine Paper Weaving Yarn. The light, airy texture is complemented by Brooks Bouquet detailing and filters light beautifully. 

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Materials 

This pattern is designed to weave a pair of curtains that measure 35.5" W x 69" L. If your windows are similar in size we recommend purchasing one kit. If your windows are considerably larger or you would like to make multiple pairs, we recommend purchasing two kits.



Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 2-4 shaft loom12 dent reedshuttle & bobbins
  • EPI: 16 (threaded in a 12 dent reed 2-1-1-2-1-1)
  • Width at Reed: 39.625" 
  • Warp Ends: 634
  • Warp Length: 8 yards
  • Length on the Loom: Approximately 200" (100" each panel to account for shrinkage and hemming) 
  • PPI: 16
  • Draft: Plain Weave 
  •  Finishing Details: Wet finished and sewn into 2 panels that measure approximately 69" L x 35.5" W with a doubled 5" bottom hem and a doubled 1 1/2" rod pocket. Each panel measures about 83" before cutting and hemming.
  •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, air dry, steam or iron on lowest setting as needed.
  • Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         

    Weaving and Finishing

    Erin writes, "I wanted to make sheer, airy curtains focusing on the textures of the different yarns, so I sett my project loosely, and in the warp I alternated big stripes of the UKI cotton (five stripes) and the Brassard cotton (six stripes) at 54 ends each. In between these thicker stripes I alternated thin stripes of four ends each of the silk/ramie and silk noil, for a total of 10 skinny stripes (five stripes of each). I made sure to have enough yarn in the warp to do a sample in order to try different techniques and to calculate shrinkage after washing." 

    Yarn A = UKI 8/2 Un-mercerized Cotton Weaving Yarn

    Yarn B = 8/2 Un-mercerized Brassard Weaving Yarn

    Yarn C = Silk / Ramie Weaving Yarn

    Yarn D = 10/2 Silk Noil Weaving Yarn

    Yarn E = White Fine Paper Weaving Yarn 

    Wind a warp repeating the following sequence 5 times, and then wind 54 ends of Yarn A, for a total of 634 warp ends: 

    • 54 ends of Yarn A 
    • 4 ends of Yarn C
    • 54 ends of Yarn B 
    • 4 ends of Yarn D

    "For the weft I again alternated the wider stripes, 51 picks each at 16 ppi, of the UKI and Brassard, and I added in a wide stripe of the fine paper. In between the UKI and Brassard I did a skinny stripe of the silk/ramie, and on either side of the paper yarn I did a stripe of the silk noil. Each skinny stripe was 4 picks each. The overall effect was a windowpane plaid in different textures of yarn." 

    Repeat the following sequence for each panel: 

    • 51 picks of Yarn A
    • 4 picks Yarn C
    • 51 picks Yarn B 
    • 4 picks Yarn D
    • 51 picks Yarn E
    • 4 picks Yarn D

    "I randomly chose some of the wider stripes and inlaid some brooks bouquet. I wove three picks in the stripe then went four ends into each stripe, wrapped around the next five ends, wove the the next five, wrapped the next five and so on until there were four ends left, and then I wove the rest of the row. Then I wove four picks, and on the fifth pick I staggered the wraps, so I wove nine ends, wrapped five, wove five ends, wrapped five, and so on until there were nine ends left in the stripe. Then I wove the rest of the row. I repeated these on every fifth pick nine times for a total of 48 picks in the stripe, then I wove the last three picks (for a total of 51 in the stripe), and switched yarn for the skinny stripe. (The pictures I included may help clarify this a bit...)"

    For more information on Brooks Bouquet see this tutorial on the Schacht Spindle Company website. 

    "I made sure each panel was at least 100" long to account for shrinkage, and to give enough fabric to sew the hem and rod pocket, but I like to give myself extra wiggle room, so I wove an extra 15" overall, so I would have enough to make sure my stripes lined up across both panels.

    Then I cut the fabric off the loom, soaked it in the bathtub with some Woolite and warm water, and ironed it until it was dry. I then cut each panel to 83" making sure the stripes lined up as closely as possible. For the rod pockets I ironed the top down 1 1/2", and then I folded that down another 1 1/2", pressed, and sewed. For the hem, I pressed 5", then folded up another 5", pressed, and sewed. I like using double hems because it makes the curtains feel more substantial. Then I used a tension rod and hung them in my window—done!"

    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

    About the Artist 

    Formally trained as a graphic designer and illustrator, Erin Supinski spends all of her free time weaving from her home studio in Brooklyn. Drawn to the tactility of weaving and primarily self-taught, she has been weaving since 2014. She loves to create items that are functional, simple, and beautiful out of natural materials.

    To see more of Erin's work and process check out her Instagram

    Erin Supinski Artist Bio
    July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

    Tencel Wave Scarf

    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     

    Wave Scarf 

    *Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

    Strong, washable, and super soft, this yarn is the perfect (and affordable) alternative to silk. Sarah designed this beautiful weaving project using three cones in complementing colors to create a soft gradient. Wind a warp long enough for three scarves and try weaving each scarf using a different weft color. This is a fun way to experiment with how different weft colors affect the same warp. See all the project details below and purchase a kit to get started! 

    Materials

    Warp & Weft: 3 cones of 8/2 weaving yarn

    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     

    Project Notes 

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, shuttle & bobbinsfringe twister 
    • EPI: 24
    • Width at Reed: 8"
    • Warp Ends: 192
    • Warp Length: 7.25 yards
    • Draft: 2/2 Twill (see draft below) and tabby
    • Finished Dimensions: 3 scarves that measure approximately 7" W x 68" L + 5" of fringe on each side
    • Finishing Details: Hemstitch, twisted fringe
    • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold & tumble dry low, iron to bring out the shine
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf

    Pattern

    In the photos above, Color A is Silver (lightest color), Color B is Sage (medium color), and Color C is Lime Green (darkest color)

    Warp Color Order: Warp the following pattern for a total of 192 warp ends.

    12A - 1B - 5A - 2B - 4A - 1C - 1B - 2A - 4B - 2C - 4A - 3B - 1C - 4A - 3B - 1C - 4B - 6A - 4B - 2C - 4B - 2A - 8B - 2C - 2A - 2C - 8B - 6C - 6B - 2A - 8B - 8C - 4B - 2A - 4C - 4B - 6C - 2B - 2A - 10C - 4B - 8C - 4A - 2B - 8C - 2B - 6C

    Weft Color Order: Weave scarf 1 with Color A as the weft, scarf 2 with Color B as the weft, and scarf 3 with Color C as the weft. Begin and end each scarf with hemstitch and leave 12" of space between scarves for fringe. Alternate between twill (see draft) and tabby on each scarf, following this sequence:

    • 4" of twill 
    • 64" tabby 
    • 4" twill 

    Finishing: Cut the scarves apart leaving 6" of fringe on each side. Machine wash and tumble dry low. (If you did not hemstitch, make sure to secure the edges first!) Press with a warm iron to bring out the shine. Twist fringe and trim to about 5" on each side. 

    About Sarah Resnick

    Sarah Resnick is the founder of GIST: Yarn & Fiber, and the host of the Weave podcast. She learned how to weave in Toronto in 2009, and was hauling a Craigslist loom up to her apartment two months later...she's never looked back since! Other parts of her fiber journey included selling handwoven baby wraps, helping to launch a sewing factory in Fall River, Massachusetts, and creating Jewish ritual textiles for people celebrating life cycle events. The thread that winds through everything she does is a passion for building systems that directly support farmers, manufacturers, and artists to bring value and beauty into the world. 

    Sarah Resnick
    July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

    Cozy Merino Rigid Heddle Scarf

    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom

    Cozy Merino Rigid Heddle Scarf 

    *Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

    This oh-so-simple scarf by Sarah Resnick is made with 3 skeins of soft and cozy Merino Wool Weaving Yarn. Three shades of blue create a gradation of color through stripes in the warp and weft. This scarf is designed to be woven on a rigid heddle loom but can also be made on a floor or table loom. 

    If you are just getting started with weaving this an ideal project to dive into! For more information on choosing a rigid heddle loom, download our free guide here: Guide to Choosing and Using your First Rigid Heddle Loom

    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                         
    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                         

    Materials 

    Warp & Weft: 3 skeins of Merino Wool Weaving Yarn 

    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom

    Project Notes

    •  Tools Required: Rigid heddle loom8 dent reedstick shuttlesfringe twister 
    •  EPI: 8  
    •  Width at Reed: 9"  
    •  Warp Ends: 72 
    •  Warp Length: 3 yards
    •  Draft: Tabby weave 
    •  Finished Dimensions: One scarf that measures approximately 8" W x 80" L including fringe 
    •  Finishing Details: Hem stitch, 4" twisted fringe on each side 
    •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, lay flat to dry
    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                        
    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                         

    Pattern 

    Color A = Blue Pansy, Color B = Spruce Blue, Color C = Bluet 

    Warp Color Order: Wind a warp in the following order for a total of 72 warp ends. You can use the direct or indirect warping method for this scarf. 

    • 24 ends of Color A
    • 24 ends of Color B
    • 24 ends of Color C 

    Weft Color Order: Weave the following color block sequence for a total of ~72". Measure the length of your stripes when the loom is not under tension for the most accurate measurement. Begin and end your scarf with hem stitch (tutorial here) and make sure to leave enough room for fringe. Feel free to experiment with your own pattern of weft stripes throughout the scarf! 

    • 24" of Color A
    • 24" of Color B
    • 6" of Color C
    • 6" of Color B
    • 9" of Color A
    • 3" of Color C 

    Finishing: Once you have finished, cut the scarf off the loom and hand wash in cold water with a mild detergent. When the scarf is dry, trim the fringe to about 4" on each side and use a fringe twister to finish.

    Free Pattern Weave a Cozy Merino Wool Scarf on a Rigid Heddle Loom

    About Sarah Resnick

    Sarah Resnick is the founder of GIST: Yarn & Fiber, and the host of the Weave podcast. She learned how to weave in Toronto in 2009, and was hauling a Craigslist loom up to her apartment two months later...she's never looked back since! Other parts of her fiber journey included selling handwoven baby wraps, helping to launch a sewing factory in Fall River, Massachusetts, and creating Jewish ritual textiles for people celebrating life cycle events. The thread that winds through everything she does is a passion for building systems that directly support farmers, manufacturers, and artists to bring value and beauty into the world. 


    Sarah Resnick
    July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

    Clasped Weft Scarf

    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

    Clasped Weft Scarf

    *Please note, we no longer carry all of this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

    This timeless scarf is woven with a luxurious combination of silk and alpaca. Stripes are woven throughout the cloth using a technique called clasped weft, adding visual interest and accentuating the twill pattern. 

    Designed by Mariah Gaar for GIST: Yarn & Fiber. 

    Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                         
    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                         

    Materials 

    Warp: 1 skein of 20/2 Bombyx Silk Yarn in White

    Weft: 2 x 1/2 lb. cones of 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn in contrasting colors (Mariah used cloud and black, see all color suggestions below)

    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                         
    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                         

    Project Notes

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, shuttle & bobbins, 10 or 15 dent reed
    • EPI: 15 *If using a 10 dent reed, thread (1,2,1,2,1,2)*
    • Width at Reed: 18" 
    • Warp Ends: 270
    • Warp Length: 3.3 yards
    • Technique: Birds Eye Twill, clasped weft
    • Finished Dimensions: 16" W x 76" L 
    • Finishing Details: Hem stitch, 6" fringe 
    • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, lay flat to dry 

    Weaving & Finishing 

    Begin and end your scarf with hemstitch

    Color A = Cloud, Color B = Black

    Weft Color Order: Mariah writes, "When planning for this scarf I wanted to create something that felt balanced and carried the eye from one section to the next. I repeated and reflected a simple stripe layout in 6 sections that were 7" long. Each one of these sections were separated with 6" breaks. For each of the main sections: 2" of the primary weft was woven, 1/2" of the accent weft was woven (using the clasped weft technique), 2" of primary weft, 1/2" of accent weft (clasped), finally finishing this section with another 2" of the primary weft. For the separating breaks between the main pattern sections: 1/2" accent weft woven the entirety of the width, 5" of primary weft, then another 1/2" of accent weft.This can then be repeated as many times as desired or in smaller/greater lengths. Again, I repeated the main section 6 times with 5 of the 'breaks' in between."

    Section 1

    • 2" Color A*
    • 1/2" Color B (clasped weft technique)
    • 2" Color A 
    • 1/2" Color B (clasped weft technique)
    • 2" Color A

    Section 2 

    • 1/2" Color B (woven across full width) 
    • 5" Color A
    • 1/2" Color B (woven across full width) 
    • Repeat from * 

    Repeat section 1 a total of 6 times and section 2 a total of 5 times for a total of about 72." 

    Clasped Weft Technique: Mariah writes, "The clasped weft technique was used to create an eye-catching and impactful design while keeping the piece relatively minimal. To create this design you need two shuttles filled with the primary weft (used in the main body of the scarf) and your secondary weft (used as an accent). With the shed open slide your primary shuttle through -- wrapping it around your secondary shuttle's yarn so that it forms a loop around the accent weft. Pull the clasped accent yarn back into the open shed and position it where you like. Keeping it relatively loose -- close the shed and beat. Move on to the next sequence in your treadling and repeat." 

    For a full tutorial on the clasped weft weaving technique, check out this post on the Bluprint website

    Finishing: Once you have finished weaving, hand wash the scarf in cold water with a mild detergent and hang to dry. When the scarf is dry, iron or steam the fabric on the lowest setting and trim the fringe to the desired length. 

    Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

    About Mariah Gaar

    "I have a background in Studio Art -- specifically in fibers and graphic design. In my own work, I aim to create access to heirloom quality textiles. I explore various natural fibers and color combinations to make something worthy of holding on to. I focus on the juxtaposition between art and function - and try to find the balance between the two. Weaving is my passion and I enjoy continuing to learn more about this medium every day."

    Weaving Projects by Mariah Gaar 

    Website | Instagram

    July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

    Rosepath Twill Scarf

    Rosepath Twill Scarf 

    *Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

    An elegantly textured scarf for autumn and winter. The Rosepath twill structure is woven with a plush merino wool pattern weft on a tabby (plain weave) foundation of camel silk and cotton linen

    Designed by Emma Rhodes for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

    Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

    Materials 

    Warp: 1 cone of Duet Cotton Linen, 1 cone of 2/6 Camel Silk 

    Weft: Tabby Weft: Remaining 2/6 Camel Silk, Pattern Weft: 100% Merino Wool

    Project Notes

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, 8 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins, stick shuttle
    • EPI: 16
    • PPI: about 13 in tabby and about 8 in pattern
    • Width at Reed: 15.25"
    • Warp Ends: 244
    • Warp Length: 3 yards
    • Technique: Tabby and Rosepath Twill
    • Finished Dimensions: 13.5" W (tabby sections), 11.25" W (pattern section) x 74" L + 3" fringe on each side
    • Finishing Details: Hemstitch 
    • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with mild soap, lay flat to dry, press as needed
                         
                         

    Weaving & Finishing 

    Warp Order: Wind a warp following the sequence below for a total of 244 warp ends. 

    • Yarn A - 4 ends* 
    • Yarn B - 16 ends 
    • Repeat from * 11 times
    • Yarn A - 4 ends 

    Weft and Treadling Order: Begin and end the scarf with hemstitch. This scarf is made up of 3 sections. Measure each section in the loom when it is not under tension for the most accurate measurement. 

    • Section 1: 20" of tabby with Yarn A
    • Section 2: 41" of pattern with Yarn A (tabby weft) and Yarn C (pattern weft) 
    • Section 3: 20" of tabby with Yarn A
                         
                         

    Pattern Section: Follow the treadling order and draft below.

    IMPORTANT: Both shuttles should start from the LEFT side of your loom. Draw in will be more noticeable in the pattern section, which is normal and part of the design. Make sure to interlock the thick and thin weft at the selvedges as you are weaving. (See photo).

    • Treadle 1 (tabby weft, shuttle starting from the left side)*
    • Treadle 6 (pattern weft, shuttle starting from the left side)
    • Treadle 2 (tabby) 
    • Treadle 6 (pattern)
    • Treadle 1 (tabby)
    • Treadle 5 (pattern)
    • Treadle 2 (tabby)
    • Treadle 5 (pattern)
    • Treadle 1 (tabby)
    • Treadle 4 (pattern)
    • Treadle 2 (tabby)
    • Treadle 4 (pattern)
    • Treadle 1 (tabby)
    • Treadle 3 (pattern)
    • Treadle 2 (tabby)
    • Treadle 3 (pattern)
    • Repeat from * until you have woven 41" of pattern 

    Note: The draft shows tabby picks as well as pattern picks for clarity. The treadling sequence on this draft is to show the different sections of the scarf. Reference the weft and treadling order written above as you weave.

    Finishing: In loom the scarf should measure approximately 14" wide in tabby sections and 12" wide in pattern section by 81" long. Wet finish the scarf by hand using warm water and mild soap. Gently agitate the fibers to lightly full the wool in the pattern section of the scarf. Rinse and roll up in a towel to absorb excess water. Lay flat to dry. Press with a warm iron. Trim fringe to 3" on each side. Note: when washing this scarf in the future use cold water to prevent any further felting. 

                        
                         

    Variations

    Experiment with the Rosepath threading and treadling -- there are so many design possibilities! You can also try a version on 8 shafts

    About Emma Rhodes

    Emma Rhodes is an artist and handweaver. Her work explores material, structure, and the capacity of her Macomber handloom.

    Emma earned her BFA in Fibers from Massachusetts College of Art & Design. She lives and works (as GIST's Community Coordinator!) in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Website | Instagram 

    Mariah Gaar
    July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

    Finding Your (Balanced) Beat

                         
                         

    Finding Your (Balanced) Beat

    by Christine Jablonski

    What is a balanced beat and how do I know if I have it?

    Achieving a balanced beat (also known as balanced weave) means that the number of weft picks per inch are the same as the number of warp ends per inch, and thus the warp and weft are equally visible. Many of our patterns call for a balanced beat, or very close to it. 

    However, when looked at on the loom under tension, a balanced beat can look a little loose, often prompting the weaver to wonder, am I doing this correctly?

    A Closer Look

    In this photo, the weaving was done with a 12 dent reed. At the bottom (between 4 and 5”), you can count the weft threads between the T-pins and see exactly 12 picks, where the dashes of yellow weft appear to be about the same size as the blue warp lengths--a truly balanced beat. Looking closely you may see little squares of space between the threads, but those spaces will close up during wet finishing (a subject for another day), so not to worry.

    Moving up one inch, we count 9-10 weft picks between the T-pins. This lighter beat makes the long blue lengths of the warp more dominant than the short dashes of the yellow weft. The spaces between the threads would not close up as tightly as in the previous example, and result in a looser, gauzier cloth.

    Lastly, in the top example we count 14 weft picks between inches 2 and 3—a slightly denser beat where the yellow weft is more dominant, and which would result in a slightly stiffer cloth.  

    Practice & Experiment

    Your project, materials and personal preferences should determine your beat. A very dense beat creates a stiff cloth, which would work well for a runner or placemat, but wouldn’t be great as a scarf. A very loose weave may make a wonderful casual window screen, but not a great shawl. 

    So experiment, measure and practice—you’ll find your beat in no time!

    About Christine Jablonski

    In addition to being GIST's Operations Manager and Wholesale Director, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram



    July 20, 2020 — Christine Jablonski

    Weave an Alternating Block Twill Scarf

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    Block Twill Scarf 

    PATTERN UPDATE: Please note that this yarn is no longer available on 1/2 lb cones. You can purchase 1kg cones here. 

    This week we are featuring a warm & cozy alpaca scarf by Morgan Hale. Using three cones of our 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn, Morgan wove this colorful design using alternating twill blocks to create a unique optical illusion. See all the details below and purchase a kit to get started! 

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Materials 

    PATTERN UPDATE: Please note that this yarn is no longer available on 1/2 lb cones. You can purchase 1kg cones here. 

    Warp & Weft: 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn - Morgan used Cloud, Denim and Forest

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Project Notes

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft loom, 12 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins
    • EPI: 12
    • Width at Reed: 14" + an extra 8 threads
    • Warp Ends: 176 
    • Warp Length: 3 yards
    • Draft: Alternating Twill Blocks (see draft below)
    • Total Warp Yarn Used: ~625 yards 
    • Total Weft Yarn Used: ~225 yards of each color, ~675 yards total
    • Finished Dimensions: 13" x 84" L (+ fringe)
    • Finishing Details: Knotted 5" fringe on each side
    • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, lay flat to dry
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Pattern 

    Warp: Wind your warp with Color A for a total of 176 warp ends. Feel free to experiment with warp stripes instead of a solid color if that strikes your fancy. 

    Weft Color Order: Repeat the following pattern for a total of 84". Each block of 14" is made up of 10 twill pattern squares.

    • 14" Color B
    • 14" Color A 
    • 14" Color C
    • 14" Color B
    • 14" Color A
    • 14" Color C
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    Morgan adapted this Alternating Block Twill draft from a pattern found on handweaving.net. Feel free to adjust the number of repeats depending on how tightly you pack the weft picks. 

    Finishing: Morgan writes, "One thing I noticed with this pattern is that the alternating twill makes it hard to get perfect selvedges. It bothered me a bit while I was weaving but once it’s off the loom, and worn it’s really not noticeable. I chose to do knotted fringe on this scarf even though I usually do a hemstitched edge on most of my scarves. I think the hand knotting gives this scarf a little extra depth." 

    Tip: You can also add 1 floating selvedge to each side to minimize this issue. For more information on floating selvedges, check out this page on the Schacht website. 

    About The Artist 

    Morgan Hale’s work aims to be ethereal and relaxing, evoking a feeling of calm in the viewer. Her pieces focus on melding the texture, pattern and color of mid century and vintage designs with a modern, minimalist aesthetic. 

    While she enjoys working in a variety of mediums, her main focus, and love, is weaving on her large floor loom. She finds the process of weaving relaxing and meditative, and is propelled by its repetitive rhythm and movement. 

    Morgan graduated from Massachusetts College of Art and Design with a BFA in Fine Arts, Fibers. She currently resides and works in New York City.

    Artist Morgan Hale
    July 17, 2020 — Emma Rhodes