Journal – GIST: Yarn & Fiber
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Free Pattern to Weave these Silk Noil Neck Scarves

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Flourish Silk Noil Neck Scarves

Soft, textured, and oh so simple. These elegant silk noil neck scarves by Emma Rhodes are designed to be woven on a floor loom OR a rigid heddle loom. Our 10/2 Undyed Silk Noil and Japanese Silk Noil yarns weave together beautifully and become even softer after washing and wearing. Whip up this silky duo over the weekend and wear them on your neck, wrist, hair, or purse. Below you will find all the instructions and materials needed to make a pair of neck ties to complement your wardrobe. 

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                

Materials 

Warp: 1 skein of undyed 10/2 Silk Noil

Weft: 2 cones of Japanese Silk Noil 

Kits: Each kit contains enough yarn to make 2 neck scarves (+there is plenty of extra yarn so you can make more). Emma wove one of these scarves with  Japanese Silk Noil in Chili Pepper as the weft and the other with Japanese Silk Noil in Salvia Blue as the weft. See more color suggestions below or choose your own.

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Americana

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Blue Jeans

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Brick Road

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Project Notes

  • Tools required: 4 shaft loom or rigid heddle loom12 dent reedboat shuttle or stick shuttle
  • Structure: Plain weave 
  • EPI: 12 
  • Width at reed: 4.5"
  • Warp ends: 56
  • Warp length: ~113" (3.1 yards) 
  • Length measured under tension at loom: Each scarf should measure about 40-43" under tension. Make sure to weave about 1/2" - 1" with scrap yarn at the beginning and end of each scarf for spacing. 
  • Finished dimensions: 2 neck scarves that measure approximately 4" wide by 36-40" long (depending on personal preference) 
  • Finishing details: Machine stitched frayed edge (or hand stitched if you prefer)
  • Care instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent and air dry, press and steam as needed
                 
                 

Pattern & Sewing Instructions 

Emma writes: "I have an 8 shaft loom but I still find myself drawn to plain weave again and again. I love how the simple structure compliments the nubby texture of the silk noil. 

Weave each scarf about 43" under tension (and make sure to weave with scrap yarn for 1/2"-1" at the beginning and the end of each). I chose to make each a solid color but you can also experiment with stripes and color blocks. Once you have finished weaving follow these finishing instructions and reference the photos below:

  1. Cut scarves apart in the center of the scrap yarn spacer. 
  2. Fold one end over on the diagonal so that it creates a triangle. I lined up the edge of the scarf with the selvedge to make sure it was square. 
  3. Cut along the crease to create a raw diagonal edge.
  4. Set up your sewing machine for a fairly small stitch. I set mine to about a 4 on the dial and adjusted the tension accordingly. Do some tests on the scraps of fabric cut from the ends of the scarf.
  5. Line up your raw edge on the 3/8" hem line on your sewing machine. Straight stitch down the diagonal edge. Use back stitch at the beginning and end to secure the stitches. 
  6. Trim the raw edge a bit closer to the stitched line and fluff the fringe a bit to bring out the frayed edge. The stitches are hardly noticeable! Repeat on each edge for both scarves. 
  7. Wash and air dry your scarves. Press with a warm iron and lots of steam. I found that washing and ironing made a huge difference in the softness of the fabric."
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
     
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
   
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
August 15, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

Free Pattern to Weave these Striped Linen Tea Towels

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels

Coastal Linen Tea Towels

If you only have time to fit one last project in this summer, let it be linen! Linen sometimes gets a bad rep for being tricky or only for experienced weavers (not true!) but weaving with it in hot, humid temperatures can make the learning curve even easier. (See more tips below for weaving with linen).

I designed these tea towels with our gorgeous 100% linen yarn imported from a textile mill in Lithuania. I chose three subtle colors (Fog, Cream and Sea Glass) and two bright pops of color (Peacock and Goldenrod). I encourage you to experiment with your own color choices, mixing some bright colors with some neutrals. You can also see our kits below for some more suggested colorways!

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                 

Materials

  • Warp: Five ½ lb. cones of 100% linen - Color A (Fog), Color B (Cream), Color C (Peacock), Color D (Goldenrod), Color E (Sea Glass) See other suggested color combinations below or choose your own! 
  • Weft: Use remaining warp yarn as weft 
  • Each kit contains enough yarn to make five 13" x 20" tea towels 
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels Kit

Solstice

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels Kit

Herring Cove

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels Kit

Sea Glass

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft loom
  • 10 dent reed
  • EPI: 20 
  • Width at reed: 14"
  • Warp ends: 280
  • Warp length: 5 yards
  • Finished dimensions should yield enough cloth to make five approximately 13" x 20" tea towels
  • Finishing details: 1/2" rolled hem, hand-stitched 
  • Care Instructions: Linen gets softer and even more lovely with wash and use. You can machine wash and tumble dry, but if your towels get regular use, using the dryer can shorter their life span (all textiles last longer if they don't go in the dryer - the lint in your dryer is bits of the textile coming off). You can also handwash and hang on a line to dry. Either way...if you plan on ironing, you can iron while they are still slightly damp for the best results! 
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                 
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                 
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                 

Pattern

Draft: Point Draft taken from page 71 of Ann Dixon's Handweaver's Pattern Directory (see diagram below)

Warp color order: I tend to design color stripes at the warping board. Feel free to experiment with your own blocks of color as you’re warping. If you’d like to follow mine exactly, here is the order:

  1. Color A: 42 ends
  2. Color B: 6 ends
  3. Color C: 12 ends
  4. Color B: 4 ends
  5. Color A: 46 ends
  6. Color B: 4 ends
  7. Color D: 14 ends
  8. Color E: 10 ends
  9. Color D: 2 ends
  10. Color B: 4 ends
  11. Color A: 28 ends
  12. Color B: 4 ends
  13. Color C: 12 ends
  14. Color E: 2 ends
  15. Color B: 8 ends
  16. Color A: 66 ends
  17. Color D: 14 ends
  18. Color E: 2 ends

Weft color order: Get comfortable with the random! For these towels, I warped a few bobbins or pirns at a time with different colors, not entirely filling each of them so they had varying amounts of yarn on them. The great thing about these colors is that they all play so well together. So I just wove the piece with alternating blocks of color, not worrying about where one towel starts and the next stops. Each towel ends of being unique, but as a set they look lovely and coordinated together.

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels Draft
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
               
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Linen Tea Towels
                 

Tips for Weaving with Linen

Linen is one of those gorgeous, texture-y beautiful yarns that I get a lot of nervous questions about. Can I use it as a warp? Do I need to dampen it when I weave? Is it going to be hard?

I'm probably a broken record because I have pretty much the same response about everything, but for this it certainly is true: Just try it!

Linen doesn't have the elasticity of other yarn so it can be a tad more challenging as a warp, but it's nothing you can't handle. Take care to wind on with even tension, and as you are weaving, you should advance the warp frequently. Linen is very strong and won't break when you try to snap it, but it does weaken with side to side abrasion, so advancing your warp minimizes the time that any one part of the yarn is in the heddles.

(As for whether you should wet the warp while you're weaving...I have never needed to, but I live on the East Coast with a lot of humidity. If you are somewhere very dry, you could try spritzing it with a bit of water as you are weaving.)

August 07, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows

Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows

Gradient Throw Pillows

Weave and sew pair of these gorgeous throw pillows by Alexandra Forby of Daughter HandwovensUsing our Italian Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn, Alex created a beautiful gradient by alternating warp and weft colors. You can purchase a kit to get started on this project here!  

Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows
               
Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows
                 

Materials 

  • This project requires two contrasting skeins of our Italian Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn. Choose from one of the kits below or pick your own colors! Each kit includes enough yarn to weave two 27" x 27" pillows.
  • Our kits do not include pillow inserts but they can be purchased here or at your local craft store. We recommend an insert that is 28" x 28".

Farmhouse

Lavender Fields

Riverbed

Project Notes

  • Tools required: 4-shaft loom, 18 dent reed, or a 12 dent reed threaded 1,2,1,2
  • EPI: 18 
  • Width at reed: 30" 
  • Warp ends: 540 
  • Warp length: 4.5 yards 
  • Warping order: The gradient is created by gradually mixing the two colors in the warp and weft. Read Alex's advice on creating this effect below.  
  • Length measured under tension at loom: ~130"  
  • Finished woven fabric off loom should measure approximately 28" x 124" to be cut into two 28" x 62" pieces. If it's a little bigger or a little smaller, that's fine - the great thing about making pillows is that they are so forgiving!
  • Finished size of each pillow: 27" x 27"  
Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows
                
Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows
                 

Pattern

Alex writes, "For the warping order, I started with about 60 strands of the yellow linen (or color A) and then intermittently started blending in the grey threads (or color B) until at the opposite end I had about 60 strands of the grey thread. Once on the loom I tweaked this a bit further and moved some strands around until I felt it looked like a fluid gradient between the two colors. Then, my weft picks essentially mirrored the warp. I started with about 20" of yellow (color A) so the backside of the pillow would be two solid panels of grey and yellow. Then I began to pick until I matched the warp threads, making perfect squares as I worked up and across the warp threads. Finally, I finished with another 20" of grey to complete the other backside panel." 

  • This pattern uses a twill structure that is mirrored at the center of the warp (15"), and then again when you reach the middle of your weaving length (about 65" under tension) 
  • Threading: (<<1,2,3,4, 1,2,3,4, 4,3,2,1, 4,3,2,1>>)
  • Tie up: 1,2 / 2,3 / 3,4 / 4,1
  • Treadle: (1,2,3,4, 1,2,3,4, (at center, reverse) 4,3,2,1, 4,3,2,1) 

Sewing Instructions

  1. Hand wash, air dry and iron fabric 
  2. Cut fabric in half length wise so that you have two pieces that measure approximately 28" x 62"
  3. Hem the left and right edges: fold in 1/4″, iron flat, fold in 1/4″ again (a total of 1/2" on each side), iron flat, pin and sew using a simple straight stitch on your sewing machine or by hand. 
  4. After you hem the left and right sides, lay your fabric down flat and INSIDE OUT (you should be looking at the wrong side). Fold the left and right sides over to create a square and overlap them slightly in the center (see diagram). This will create the envelope opening for your pillow insert. Double check the measurements of the square to make sure that your pillow insert will fit. 
  5. Pin the folded fabric together and sew the top and bottom seams across about 1/2″ from the selvedges using straight stitch on your sewing machine or by hand. 
  6. Turn your pillow cover right side out (push corners out with a pencil if necessary) and you should have a 27″ square with an overlapping slit in the back. 
  7. Insert your pillow form and repeat steps 1-6 for the second pillow!
Free Pattern to Weave and Sew these Gorgeous Pillows


August 01, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

Weave this Cotton Summer Scarf

This week's free weaving pattern by Deborah Held is the perfect summer scarf or cowl - a simple tabby weave that can be woven on a rigid heddle loom or a floor loom. Grab up to 7 colors of 8/2 un-mercerized cotton from your stash (or buy some!) and start playing. Don't stress about picking colors - go with your gut, or choose from a few color combos I recommend below. Find all the geeky weaver details after the photos!

free cotton scarf weaving pattern

free cotton scarf rigid heddle weaving pattern

cotton weaving yarn

free cotton scarf rigid heddle weaving pattern

 Project Details

  • Warp: Up to 7 colors of 8/2 Un-Mercerized cotton weaving yarn. You'll have lots of yarn left over after this project - use it to make more scarves, or placemats and towels. 
  • Weft: 1 cone of 8/2 Un-Mercerized cotton weaving yarn (Choose your favorite color from the warp threads, or choose the lightest color so the warp colors are more dominant)
  • Warp length: 2.25 yards (you can weave 65" for a full length scarf with fringe, or you can weave 36" for a cowl and use the rest for sampling)
  • Width in Reed: 7" (This shrinks to about 6.25 wide after wet finishing. If you'd like a wider scarf, you can also do 8"-9" in the reed)
  • 84 ends
  • 12-Dent Reed, as 12 epi
  • Tabby Weave
  • 2-Shaft or 4-Shaft Loom or Rigid Heddle Loom. This was woven on a Cricket Loom
  • If you’re using a Rigid Heddle loom, you’re going to want to use an indirect warp-on to make it easier to change the warp colors. If you don’t have a warping board and can’t maneuver some kind of warping board cheat as an alternative, you can absolutely direct warp; it’s just going to take a while to do so many color changes, so be ready. Consider working in 30-minute stints to break up the work of knotting on so many individual ends.
  • Don’t forget the finish: a good wash and dry. The beauty of cotton (in addition to its lightweight wearability) is its ease of care. A light machine wash will remove factory and natural oils; a trip through the dryer softens your piece ever so delightfully. If you'd like to sew it into a cowl, you can use these instructions. If you'd like it to be a scarf, simply hem stitch and twist the fringe! 

 Debbie writes: "The scarf is woven in a balanced plain weave, centered at 7 inches in width, and with a total of 84 (single) ends. In this instance, more is more. I used seven different colors in a relatively narrow piece. (I started with five, but wasn’t getting the look I was after and added in two more.) 

As for picking colors...I enjoy the rhythm of plain weave and generally let my warp do the talking in my scarves; so I don't shy away from strong colors. I find that odd numbers work better than evens: three or five warp colors (or even seven) tend to be more pleasing than two, four, or six. I select the range of colors while thinking of a theme, be it a season, a fabric swatch to emulate, a mood, or a feeling. (In this case, I was going for an overcast summer's day, which is what these blue-based colors reminded me of when I first saw them.) No matter what, I always punctuate my color palette with one unexpected color choice. Here, that is the spicy orange yarn. In my opinion, that's what "makes" any fabric. Finally, I then choose one color from the whole shebang to serve as my "neutral," which I then use as my weft."

Really, truly, I encourage you to use from your stash or pick your own colors and design your stripes at the loom! But if you'd like our suggestions, you can find three suggested colorways, packaged up in an easy-to-purchase kit. (Note that none of these are *exactly* the colors in these photos - just my suggestions for some colors that would lovely together in a scarf like this!) You'll have lots of leftover yarn from this kit, which you can use to make more scarves, or towels and placemats. 

Deborah Held is a full-time spinster living in the Atlanta area. She finds peace and comfort among her wheels, spindles, and a great deal of wool, as well as from her best friend, 15-year-old Italian greyhound, Iggy. One of them is a regular contributor to Spin Off and www.interweave.com. They can be reached via www.debbieheld.com.
July 19, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

Weave this Weekend Rug on your Rigid Heddle or Floor Loom

This quick handwoven rug designed by Emma Rhodes is a perfect summer project! Get it warped and woven in a weekend, and have a beautiful new rug for for your own home or to give as a gift. Weave it on your floor loom or your rigid heddle loom, with an 8-dent reed. 

See all of the project details, and links to purchase the yarn, below the photos. 
handwoven rug pattern

handwoven rug pattern
 handwoven rug pattern
handwoven rug pattern
handwoven rug pattern
handwoven rug pattern
handwoven rug pattern
Project Details
  • Warp: 1 Cone 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton - Navy Blue
  • Weft: 4 Skeins Mountain Meadow Wool Tapestry Rug Wool Weaving Yarn - Jeans (for other color combos try Raspberry cotton with Black Raspberry wool, Light Gray cotton with Dove wool, or Chocolate cotton with Maple Syrup wool - or mix and match cotton and wool to choose your own colors - multi-colored stripes would also look lovely in this rug!) 
  • Use double strands of the weft (see description below for instructions)
  • Equipment: 4-shaft floor loom or Rigid Heddle loom, 8 dent reed, ~12" stick shuttle (Note that the rug will look a bit different (still beautiful) if woven on the Rigid Heddle loom - see notes below!)
  • EPI: 8 
  • Width in reed: 24"
  • Warp length: 2 yards
  • Length measured under tension on loom: 36" 
  • Finished Size: 21 x 40" (including 2.5" fringe on both sides) 
  • Finishing details: Hem stitch & twisted fringe

Four-Shaft Loom Info

  • Threading: 4-3-2-1
  • Tie up: 1-2,3-4 (this means that two adjacent warp threads will lift together)
  • Treadle: 1,2,1,2 

  • Rigid Heddle Loom Info

    • Threading: One warp thread per slot/hole
    • On a rigid heddle loom, you can only do Tabby Weave (you cannot lift two adjacent warp threads together). So in the adaptation for Rigid Heddle looms, the weft thread goes over and under each warp thread. This means that in your final rug, some of the warp thread will also remain visible, resulting in a beautiful interplay between the 8/8 cotton and the wool weft. 

    Emma writes: "I have been weaving for 7 years and this is my first rug! For this project I wanted to weave a simple, weft faced rug that would accentuate the color variations in this Tapestry Rug Wool from Mountain Meadow Wool Mill.

    I wound the skeins into center pull balls and wrapped two strands around the stick shuttle. By weaving with double strands, the variations in the color really begin to pop! The gradation from dark to light reminds me of some of the beautiful denim rag rugs I have seen recently.

    There was more draw-in then I anticipated so you can also go slightly wider at the reed, maybe 26". I love the polished look of hem stitch (tutorial here) and twisted fringe. I am looking forward to working with more colors, patterns and rug sizes in the future!"

    July 03, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

    Untitled (public parts) ~ Woven by Luiza Porto

    Today I'm sharing this woven series created by Luiza Porto with linen yarn from my shop.

    Luiza writes: "I am quite new to weaving, I have been doing it for less than a year. I started on textiles with embroidery, trying to give texture to my drawings, and since the beginning I worked with cotton thread on linen. I always try to work with natural materials, and avoid synthetic. So when I decided to try weaving, it was only natural for me to use linen yarn. Although everything I read about using linen as a warp told me not to do it, because of the lack of stretch and how it would easily wear out the yarn throughout the project. And it was very hard to find references of weaving with linen on rigid heddle loom. So every part of the project was an experiment!"

    See more details below the photos.

    Luiza Porto Linen weaving
    Luiza Porto Linen weaving
    Luiza Porto Linen weaving
    Luiza Porto Linen weaving
    luiza porto weaving linen
    luiza porto weaving linen
    Project Details

    Luiza writes:

    "I did small samples before on my frame loom, but decided to just go for it and make bigger pieces. I knew I wanted each piece to be at least 40 x 40 cm mounted. Since my pieces are focused on the opening in the middle, I always thought of it as one side, then mirrored whatever I did. To make the process easier, since I never actually learned the terms and the math behind weaving, I drew a little diagram of how I wanted to warp the loom. It was something like this:

    luiza porto weaving

    The most important thing was that the two middle threads had to be in adjacent holes (the mirror effect I wanted), so I could open the slit in the middle. I used a 60/10 heddle but warped skipping every other slot/hole. Then I had approximately 3 ends per centimetre and the warp was 42cm wide and 120cm in length. I used a 3-ply cream wetspun linen for the warp, which gave me the perfect tension and strength I needed for the project.

    My work has always revolved around the female body, and in this series I wanted to portray the stages involved in overcoming abuse. The first piece, Untitled (public parts) #1, depicts a virginal state. So I went for a plain weave, with as little flaws and texture as possible, only showing a carefully open slit in the middle. The second piece, Untitled (public parts) # 2, shows the physical and emotional damage that comes with an abuse. I tried to show the torn flesh, so I opened the slit asymmetrically and worked around it creating texture by "floating" the thread over one or more ends. I am now working on the last three pieces of the series, which will show the process of healing and the scars that remain after. 

    The idea is to have the pieces mounted on floating frames and hung in a wall with light coming in more or less 30º from the top. So the texture will be accentuated and more present. "

    May 31, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

    Weaving with Sparkling Yarn with Lena Kolb

    Today I am sharing a stunning piece Lena Kolb wove with sparkly yarn.

    Lena writes: "I wanted to create a piece that was three-dimensional as most of my woven work to this point has been flat. I figured that the piece could be fairly simple since there would be a lot going on with the hanging threads. I really enjoyed dreaming this piece up and figuring out how to bring it to life. I definitely learned a lot and plan on experimenting further with 3D work. I loved using the ITO sparkly yarn and am excited to continue to use it in my weaving." 

    See more details about the piece below the photos.

    weaving sparkly yarn
    weaving sparkly yarn
    weaving glitter yarn
    weaving with glitter yarn
    sparkly weaving
    glitter weaving yarn Lena Kolb

    Project Details

    Lena writes: "I love experimenting with simple striping techniques to create different shades and color representations... so I stuck with a simple stripe pattern. I wove the piece at 15 EPI using a black 8/2 un-mercerized cotton for the warp and some of the weft. I used the ITO Sparkly Weaving Yarn for the stripes and hanging golden threads.

    The piece is 22 x 72 x 15 inches. Placing the hanging gold threads was insanely time consuming....I  really hadn't thought about that when planning the project. I placed each gold thread around one warp thread in three different rows. That part took me longer then weaving the whole piece. I also really hadn't considered the challenge of hanging and photographing the piece when I was dreaming it up. I realized I don't have very many large white spaces in my life to photograph work and that defiantly is necessary. It was also pretty challenging to balance the dark color against the light sparkly gold in photographs.I love glitter and sparkles!"

    May 31, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

    Are you afraid of weaving with linen?

    Are you one of those weavers who is afraid of trying linen yarn? Don't be!

    linen weaving yarn

    Linen is one of those gorgeous, texture-y beautiful yarns that I get a lot of nervous questions about. Can I use it as a warp? Do I need to dampen it when I weave? Is it going to be hard? 

    I'm probably a broken record because I have pretty much the same response about everything, but for this it certainly is true: Just try it! 

    Linen doesn't have the elasticity of other yarn so it can be a tad more challenging as a warp, but it's nothing you can't handle. Take care to wind on with even tension, and as you are weaving, you should advance the warp frequently. Linen is very strong and won't break when you try to snap it, but it does weaken with side to side abrasion, so advancing your warp minimizes the time that any one part of the yarn is in the heddles. 

    (As for whether you should wet the warp while you're weaving...I have never needed to, but I live on the East Coast with a lot of humidity. If you are somewhere very dry, you could try spritzing it with a bit of water.)

    weaving

    At $15 per 1/2 lb. cone, linen is an affordable and beautiful option for your next set of towels, table runners, or placemats. I have also seen my customers weave fabric to make gorgeous dresses, make huck lace, and even knit with it.

    My linen yarn comes straight from a mill in Lithuania, and comes in a gorgeous array of subtle and unusual colors. See for yourself and shop now!

     

    May 28, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

    Weave a Tapestry Pillow and Tote Bag

    Today we're talking tapestry! Shiri Klein creates gorgeous tapestry weavings in northern New Mexico. I have followed her gorgeous work on Instagram for a while now, so I was excited to see what she could create with this very special Mountain Meadow Wool tapestry yarn

    See below the photos for all the details about how Shiri wove these pieces. You can buy wool weft here, and wool warp here

    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    wool tapestry yarn weaving
    Project Details

    Shiri writes: "I weave at 8 epi and am enjoying this  new yarn! It's a little bit thinner than my regular yarns but it mixes very well with them. It is also surprisingly soft, which is a bonus  :)

    When weaving  pillows and tote bags I tend to focus my design on one or two Rio Grande motifs  and then play with colors. For the pillows I chose an earth tone color scheme with a touch of Turquoise.The rich gradient colors of the Cider and Marigold tapestry yarns worked out beautifully with my natural dyed (black walnut) and commercially dyed yarns. For the tote bag, I used Nectarine yarn for a bold and bright contrast to the white crosses."


    May 17, 2018 by Sarah Resnick

    Three Projects to Weave on Your Rigid Heddle Loom

    By popular demand, I'm excited to share some project ideas for weaving on your rigid heddle loom. 

    silk noil weaving yarn for rigid heddle loom

    Weave a Silk Scarf
    This Italian silk noil weaving yarn ($22 each) has smooshy, soft, delicious texture and is begging for a spot on your rigid heddle loom. Choose two complimentary colors and experiment with striping, or use one for the warp and one for the weft. Two skeins will make two 8" x 70" scarves. Recommended sett of 10 epi. 
    8/2 cotton weaving yarn for rigid heddle loom
    Weave Hand Towels
    Brighten up your kitchen or give a gift that a friend will cherish. Weaving towels are the perfect opportunity to play with color! On a rigid heddle loom, I recommend doubling 8/2 un-mercerized cotton ($12.50) for the warp on a 10-dent reed, for 20 epi. For the weft you can also double the yarn if you'd like an even weave, or you can weave with a single strand of 8/2 for an interesting and different texture. Pick four colors, and you'll have enough to weave 6 towels with plenty of yarn left over for your next project. 

    Don't feel like doubling up your warp? You can also use this 8/4 un-mercerized cotton at 10 epi.

    Let your creativity fly!

    rigid heddle scarf pattern
    Wind an 8 epi warp for a scarf or shawl (depending on the width of your reed) using one cone of this glorious wool yarn ($27). For the weft, start playing with your stash! The sample on the left has alpaca yarn interspersed with silk and wool roving. Bring in beautiful textures and colors as you go, and end up with a one-of-a-kind piece.
    May 04, 2018 by Sarah Resnick