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Coastal Linen Tea Towels

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Coastal Linen Tea Towels

A set of classic linen tea towels woven with 3 colors of 100% Linen Weaving Yarn using a Fibonacci stripe sequence and a point twill structure. 

Designed by Christine Jablonski for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 3 cones of 100% Linen Weaving Yarn

This pattern makes a set of 3 towels that measure approximately 13" W x 21" L each. You will have plenty of extra yarn to use in other projects, or to make more towels!

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, 10 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins 
  • EPI: 20 (2 ends per dent in a 10 dent reed)
  • PPI: 24 
  • Width at Reed: 14.5"
  • Warp Ends: 289
  • Warp Length: 3 yards
  • Technique: Point Twill
  • Takeup & Shrinkage: Approximately 10% on length and width
  • Finished Dimensions: A set of 3 towels that measure approximately 13" W x 21" L each 
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch edge with 1/2" fringe or hand/machine sewn rolled hem
  • Care Instructions: Hand or machine wash cold on delicate cycle, lay flat to dry, press while still damp
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels
                     

Weaving & Finishing

  • Color A = Copper (darkest color)
  • Color B = Oat (lightest color)
  • Color C = Arctic (medium color)

Warp Color Order: Christine used a Fibonacci sequence (groups of 3, 5, 8, & 13 Fibonacci units) broken by small strips of 1 unit. Each of these units represents one repeat of the 6-thread sequence of this point draft. See draft below.

*Optional: Christine used one thread of the edge color for a floating selvedge on each side. It is not necessary with a twill draft such as this, but it can help make the edges neater.

  • Color A: 30 ends 
  • Color B: 6 ends 
  • Color C: 48 ends 
  • Color A: 6 ends
  • Color B: 78 ends 
  • Color C: 6 ends
  • Color A: 18 ends 
  • Color B: 6 ends
  • Color C: 30 ends 
  • Color A: 6 ends
  • Color B: 48 ends 
  • Color C: 7 ends (6 ends for the repeat, plus 1 thread in shaft 1 to balance the pattern). 

Weft Color Order: As you wish! Christine wove one towel with Color A as the weft, the second with color B, and the third with Color C. 

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Option 1: For a hemstitch edge with fringe: throw 3 picks of plain weave, hemstitch those three picks, weave 23" in pattern, finish with 3 picks of plain weave, hemstitch the end leaving 1/2" fringe on each side. Repeat this process at the beginning and end of each towel.

Option 2: For a rolled hem (machine stitched or hand sewn), weave 1" of plain weave with sewing thread (reduces bulk when the edge is rolled under and hemmed). Switch to linen, weave 23" in pattern. Switch back to sewing thread to weave 1" of plain weave. Repeat this process at the beginning and end of each towel. Zig zag raw edges using a sewing machine before washing. 

Finishing: Wet finish by hand washing or machine washing on delicate in cold water. Lay flat to dry, iron while damp. Roll zig-zagged edges under and hand or machine hem.

Variations 

The three cones of linen will give you enough yarn to make many warps, so experiment with changing up the color orders, or make one long warp to weave a beautiful runner and coordinating towels! (See weft stripe sampler below).

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

About Christine Jablonski 

In addition to being GIST's Studio & Wholesale Coordinator, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram

Christine Jablonski
October 17, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Waffle Weave Lap Blanket

Waffle Weave Lap Blanket

An extra plush blanket woven with Mallo Cotton Slub Weaving Yarn in a densely textured waffle weave structure. 

Sarah writes, "When I set out to design projects with Mallo, GIST's cotton slub yarn, a super cushy waffle weave was at the top of my list. The texture of Mallo makes this blanket extra soft and once it comes off your loom, everyone in the house is going to be fighting over who gets to cuddle with it. Weaving at 16 epi results in a very warm and dense finished piece of fabric -- you can also weave with a lower epi for something a bit airier. 

I chose to make this project in all one color so that the beauty of the yarn and the weave structure truly shine through. Pick your favorite color of Mallo and have fun with this one!" 

Designed by Sarah Resnick for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 4 cones of Mallo Cotton Slub Weaving Yarn 

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, 8 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins, fringe twister
  • EPI: 16 (2 ends per dent in an 8 dent reed) 
  • PPI: 12 
  • Width at Reed: 34" 
  • Warp Ends: 544
  • Warp Length: 2.5 yards
  • Draft/Technique: waffle weave, 4 shafts and 5 treadles
  • Finished Dimensions: Unwashed: ~ 32" W x 52" L, Washed: ~ 25" W x 40" L + 4" fringe on each side 
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch and 4" twisted fringe on each side
  • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold, tumble dry low 

Weaving & Finishing 

Begin: Wind a 2.5 yard warp with Mallo Cotton Slub Weaving Yarn for a total of 544 ends. Warp your loom with your preferred method.

Weaving: Begin and end your blanket with hemstitch. Weave until the end of the warp following the draft. Off the loom the blanket will measure approximately 32" wide by 52" long. 

Finishing: Machine wash and tumble dry low. Twist fringe and trim to about 4" on each side. 

4 Shaft Waffle Weave Draft

Variations

  • Add a second color throughout the warp and/or weft.
  • Adjust the size to make a larger blanket. (TIP: Try our yarn calculator to determine the yardage!)
  • Adjust the size to make a set of absorbent hand towels, or a larger bath towel.

About Sarah Resnick 

Sarah Resnick is the founder of GIST: Yarn & Fiber, and the host of the Weave podcast. She learned how to weave in Toronto in 2009, and was hauling a Craigslist loom up to her apartment two months later...she's never looked back since! Other parts of her fiber journey included selling handwoven baby wraps, helping to launch a sewing factory in Fall River, Massachusetts, and creating Jewish ritual textiles for people celebrating life cycle events. The thread that winds through everything she does is a passion for building systems that directly support farmers, manufacturers, and artists to bring value and beauty into the world. 

Sarah Resnick
September 25, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Checks and Stripes Tea Towels

                     
                     

Checks & Stripes Tea Towels 

Weave a set of tea towels with Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn in two classic patterns - checks and stripes! 

Designed by Chelsay Russell for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

                     
                     

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 4 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn 

Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                    

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 2-4 shaft table or floor loom, or rigid heddle loom12 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins 
  • EPI: 12
  • Width at Reed: 20"
  • Warp Ends: 240
  • Warp Length: 2.5 yards
  • Technique: Plain weave 
  • Finished Dimensions: Set of 2 towels each measuring approximately 27.5" L x 19" W
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch (optional), 1.5" fringe tassels on each side
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash with mild soap, hang to dry, or machine wash cold & tumble dry low, press as needed
Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                     

Weaving & Finishing 

Warp Color Order: Wind a warp in the following sequence for a total of 240 warp ends. 

  • Color A - 48 ends
  • Color B - 48 ends 
  • Color C - 48 ends
  • Color D - 48 ends 
  • Color A - 48 ends 

Weft Color Order Towel #1: Begin and end each towel with hemstitch. When you finish weaving the first towel, weave at least a 3" spacer with scrap yarn before beginning the second towel. Repeat the following sequence 4 times for the first towel

  • Color A - 36 picks
  • Color D - 3 picks 
  • Color C - 3 picks 
  • Color A - 2 picks 
  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color A - 3 picks 
  • Color B - 4 picks 
  • Color A - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 15 picks 
  • Color D - 3 picks 
  • Color C - 4 picks 
  • Color D - 15 picks 
  • Color A - 3 picks 
  • Color D - 2 picks 

Weft Color Order Towel #2: Repeat the following sequence 2 times

  • Color C - 60 picks
  • Color B - 60 picks
  • Color A - 60 picks 
  • Color D - 60 picks 

Finishing: Once you have finished weaving, remove the towels from the loom and cut them apart at the center of the scrap yarn spacer. If you did not use hemstitch, secure the edges with overhand knots to create the tassel fringe. Hand wash with mild soap, hang to dry, (or machine wash cold & tumble dry warm if you prefer), and press. Trim the fringe to 1.5” on each side. 

Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Checks and Stripes Handwoven Cotton Linen Tea Towels
                    

About Chelsay Russell

"My name is Chelsay Russell and I create woven goods out of my home in Branson, Missouri. I started weaving in fall of 2015 by watching tutorials online and by summer of 2016, I created Little Weavebird. My small business has been growing ever since, as well my passion for the art of weaving.

Quickly after starting out on a rigid heddle loom, I knew I wanted to expand my knowledge and skill set. I bought a floor loom from Leclerc called, Weavebird. That is how "Little Weavebird" came to be."

Website | Instagram 

Chelsay Russell Little Weavebird
September 10, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Color and Weaving with Tien Chiu

Color & Weaving with Tien Chiu 

This week we are diving into a solution for one of the questions we get asked most often - if I weave with this mix of colors, will they look good together? We try our best to give advice, but the truth is that the design process plays a big part in determining whether beautiful, bright colors weave up into the bold piece you are dreaming of, or a flat dull pattern. 

There’s a common misconception that some people just have a “gift” for color, and that the rest of us are doomed to muddle along and hope for the best. But the truth is that there’s a lot of science and technique to working with color, and you - anyone! - can learn these techniques.

We are welcoming Tien Chiu (you may remember Tien from Episode 3 of the Weave Podcast), to give us some insight on weaving with bold, bright colors. Tien is the founder of Warp & Weave, a website which features articles about color, a color mixing tool for weavers, and online classes about color and weaving. 

Bold & Subtle Patterns - Free Mini Course 

If you’re ready to dive in and learn more, we encourage you to check out Bold & Subtle Patterns - a free online mini-course by Tien Chiu. This survey course will teach you how to pick yarn to create beautiful projects that come out with crisp, clear patterns - or understated ones - exactly as you like. Throughout the course, Tien covers topics such as color value, light vs. dark, pattern and scale. 

Design Your Own Towels - A Color Exercise

Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

Also included in this course is a design-your-own project exercise, Illusion Dish Towels. These towels feature stripes of reversing twill “arrows” that give the illusion of diagonal movement, even though the stripes are perfectly straight!

Tien developed this interactive exercise that allows you to mix and match different colors of 8/2 Un-Mercerized Cotton and to see in real time how the colors look together in a weaving draft. Below are a few screen shots of this interactive exercise included in the course. 

Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

You can use this tool to design your own color combination and weave a set of Tien Chiu's Illusion Towels on your 4 shaft loom. All you need to complete this project are 2 cones of 8/2 Un-Mercerized Cotton Weaving Yarn in a color combination of your choice. Experiment with the exercise to see how the colors interact in unexpected ways! Download Tien's pattern below to weave your own customized towels. 

Color & Design - 6 Week Online Course

Bold and Subtle Patterns is a preview of Color & Design, Tien’s new online course, which she will be teaching from September 22-November 2, 2019. Color & Design teaches you how to design handwoven fabric with the look and feel that you want. You’ll learn how to control the pattern clarity, degree of color mixing, and mood of the fabric through your choice of color palette, draft, and yarn size/pattern scale. 

In this six-week online course, you’ll get text and video lessons, fun interactive online exercises, inspirational handwoven galleries, discussion questions, a chance to design and weave your own projects, and weekly live Q&A sessions with Tien.

Registration is open NOW through Friday, September 13, 2019. We are proud to be partnering with Tien Chiu on this course launch, and appreciate that a portion of the sales of her course will go to support our blog and podcast. 

Tien is also hosting a free webinar this Sunday September 8, 2019 at 2pm Pacific about color mixing in handwoven cloth. Learn to predict how different colors will weave up together, and get your other color questions answered, too! Click here to sign up for the webinar

About Tien Chiu

Tien Chiu is an artist, weaver, and “art scientist” based near San Jose, California. 

Tien started weaving in 2006, when she bought an 8-shaft Baby Wolf and fell madly in love. Since then, she’s been obsessed with dyeing, weaving, and sewing her own handwoven creations. She spent one year and over 1,000 hours weaving and sewing her wedding dress, which is now in the permanent collection at The Henry Ford Museum. Her riotously colorful Kodachrome Jacket, which immediately followed the wedding dress, was featured on the cover of Handwoven

Tien also loves writing. She’s written over 30 articles for weaving magazines, and wrote a book about the creative process in craft - Master Your Craft: Strategies for Designing, Creating, and Selling Artisan Work. 

Beyond weaving and writing, Tien loves what she calls “art science”. Raised by two scientists and trained in mathematics at Caltech, Tien says that while she considers herself an artist, science is a big part of her approach to art, and particularly to color.

Website | Warp & Weave | Online Classes | Weave Podcast Episode 3 

Tien Chiu
                     
Tien Chiu Free Mini Course Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
September 04, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Handwoven Apron and Towel

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                    
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

A Duet Duet - Handwoven Apron & Towel

By melissa hankens

Melissa writes, "As I write this, I am in the process of moving from Salem, Massachusetts up to the Portland, Maine area. I grew up in Maine, and its siren song is calling me back for a third time, now with family in tow. One exciting aspect of this move is that I will have a dedicated studio in my backyard. Surely this is a weaver’s dream come true.

I was thrilled to create one last project in my Salem studio, using Duet, the beautiful new cotton/linen blend yarn from Gist. I spend a lot of time weaving with plant fibers, and the quality of Duet is impressive. The 55% linen gives it a luxurious feel. You know that feeling of weight you get when you hold a warp chain of linen? This is it. And the 45% cotton means that it is incredibly soft straight off of the loom. The combination creates a fabric that is irresistible.

So I have created a Duet duet for your weaving pleasure. This is a quick twill weave inspired by vintage French grain sacking, and it only requires a three yard warp. 

One half of our duet is an extra large towel that can easily tackle any job your kitchen throws in its direction. Delicately dab your greens dry! Transport your tomatoes from the garden to the kitchen in its soft embrace! Sop up the heartiest of spills! The possibilities are endless!

The second part of our duet is an apron. This apron is a no frills workhorse, large enough that you’ll always find a fresh spot to dry your hands. I love to cook, and I am forever trying to remember where I left my hand towel. The Duet apron is essentially your favorite hand towel with a strap!" 

Designed by Melissa Hankens for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 5 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn 

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, or rigid heddle loom*, 8 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins 
  • EPI: 16
  • Width at Reed: 24"
  • Warp Ends: 384
  • Warp Length: 3 yards
  • Draft: 2-2 twill
  • Finished Dimensions: Apron: ~ 37" L x 20" W, Towel: ~ 30" L x 21" W
  • Finishing Details: See hemming/sewing instructions below
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash warm with mild soap, hang to dry, press as needed, or machine wash and dry 
  • Note: *If you are using a rigid heddle loom, weave this project in plain weave at 12 ends per inch with a 12 dent heddle (288 ends for a 24" wide warp). 

Weaving & Finishing 

Melissa's finished apron dimensions: Waist: 37", Length: 20", Ribbon: 74" 

"You’ll need to determine the width of your apron ahead of time. I wanted mine to wrap all the way around and meet in the back. I took a piece of cotton yarn and wrapped it around my waist following the circumference I wanted it to rest upon when tied. Before I cut the cotton measuring string, I added 6”, 4” for the hems at each end and another 2” to account for the fabric shrinking. This left me with a measuring string just over 42” in length. I marked the center point (it’s helpful to use a light color string and a dark marker or pen for contrast) so that I knew where to place the center of my pattern, and I set the string aside. 

I have a thing for the number three as well as a bit of sneaky asymmetry. I wove a 2” header [with Color A] and then added three thin stripes in Santorini [Color B]. Each stripe was two picks separated by two picks of Dune [Color A]. Once my weaving was underway, I pinned the measuring string along the edge of my fabric. You can tuck it off of the front of your loom so it doesn’t interfere with your weaving. As you advance the cloth, be sure that your measuring string follows the fabric as it is rolled on. 

Continue to weave your 2-2 twill in Dune [Color A] until you start to see the center mark on your measuring string. Feel free to improvise here. When you are about 3” from your center mark weave as indicated below. If you are slightly off, feel free to turn your pattern at whatever your center point happens to be. My striped pattern is as follows:

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel

Measuring string

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel

Center mark on measuring string

  • 4 picks Color B
  • 4 picks Color A
  • 4 picks Color B 
  • 12 picks Color A
  • 16 picks Color B
  • 2 picks Color A*
  • 2 picks Color B 

This should, approximately meet the center point on your measuring string. From here, repeat the sequence in reverse starting from *).

2/2 Twill Weaving Draft
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

Weave your 2-2 twill in Dune [Color A] until you reach the end of your measuring string.

The rest of your warp will be used to create the companion towel. I placed a dowel in my warp to create a space between projects. You can also use a contrasting string. Feel free to create any combination of stripes you’d like. I wove about 6” of Dune [Color A] and then added three stripes of Santorini [Color B] using 12 picks for the outer stripes and 16 picks for the center stripe. From here I wove until I reached the end of my warp.

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

I cut the fabric from the loom, and machine stitched the cut edges as well as the edges to be cut at the center to prevent fraying. From here, the fabric went into the washing machine and dryer. No need to be cautious here. Once dry, I pressed the seams, folding the cut edges under twice to hide them away. Feel free to add a loop for hanging your towel at this point, and then stitch your hems in place. Your towel is now finished!

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

The final step to complete your apron is adding the waist tie. Since you will be folding a selvedge over to create the channel for your tie, there is no need to double fold. Press your hem over about ¼” wider than your tie material. I used a tightly woven cotton ribbon 5/8” wide and measured it to twice the width of the fabric. If you want to tie your apron at the front, a la Julia Child, you may want to add more length. A cloth tape measure can help sort this out for you. Once you stitch your hem in place, clasp a safety pin to the end of your ribbon, and thread it through the channel. The pin will help you guide it along and can be removed once it’s through to the other side. Voila! Dinner party time!" 

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Apron and Towel
                     

About Melissa Hankens  

Melissa Hankens is a weaver based in the Portland, Maine area. While she has been weaving professionally for over a decade, her career may have started one fateful Christmas long ago when, at the age of nine, she was gifted her first loom.

Melissa works extensively with natural fibers, primarily hemp, linen, and wool, to create beautiful and functional linens, blankets, and garments. She takes the idea of fewer, better things to heart with the creation of every piece, and loves to bring out the natural beauty of the materials she uses. Each seam is pressed in place and hand sewn, a process she feels gives her pieces heart and also pays homage to the way things used to be made: one at a time, with care, and meant to last. 

Also by Melissa Hankens: 

Cotton & Linen Spring Scarf 

Website | Instagram 

Melissa Hankens
August 15, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Weaver's PlayBox # 2 for Rigid Heddle Weavers - Towels

Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers Cotton and Linen

Box #2 - Cotton & Linen

We are thrilled to collaborate with Liz Gipson of Yarnworker on Weaver's PlayBox # 2, that is filled with yarn, project inspiration, and helpful tips created especially for rigid heddle weavers.

Our second box is all about sharing our passion for cotton and linen in its many forms. The box is designed to take the anxiety out of choosing yarns for home textiles. Each box includes 5 skeins / cones of yarn from 4 of our favorite North American mills: Cestari in Virginia, Brassard in Quebec, Huntingdon Yarn Mill in Pennsylvania, and Meridian in North Carolina. Liz Gipson's beautifully designed 11-page PDF guide is packed with project information and techniques that teach you how to make 9 different towels on 3 different warps (see a few of these example towels in the photos). Your PlayBox includes enough yarn to choose and make at least a dozen towels.  You will need a rigid heddle loom with at least a 15" weaving width, and a 10 dent heddle, to complete these projects. 

If you're just learning to weave* this is a great opportunity to get to know your loom, experiment with a range of cotton and linen yarns, and create some beautiful projects. And if you've already been weaving on your loom for a while, this box will introduce you to new materials and ideas that will help you flex your creativity and dream up new ideas for how to use your rigid heddle loom. 

To learn more about Liz Gipson and her teaching style, check out our latest podcast interview with Liz here

*If you have never woven anything on a rigid heddle loom, we recommend you do a few projects first before diving into the Weaver's PlayBox. Send us an email at hello@gistyarn.com if you'd like some help picking your first rigid heddle project.

Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers
                     
Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers
                     

Choose Your Box

Weaver's PlayBox ($100) 

Includes 5 skeins/cones of cotton and linen yarn from North American mills and a 10 page PDF guide packed with techniques and tips for rigid heddle weavers. 

Weaver's PlayBox Book Bundle ($113)

Includes the Weaver's PlayBox + a 78 page digital copy of Liz Gipson's brand new book, "A Weaver's Guide to Yarn."

Weaver's PlayBox Loom Bundle ($342)

Includes the Weaver's PlayBox Book Bundle (your choice of colorway), a 16" Ashford SampleIt Rigid Heddle Loom, a 7.5 dent reed, a 10 dent reed, and 2 pick up sticks. Everything you need to weave the PlayBox and so much more!

Community Facebook Group

Interested in seeing what people are weaving on their rigid heddle looms? Join the Weaver's PlayBox Facebook Group. This group is open to everyone - come follow along and share your projects & inspiration. 

Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers
                     
Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers
                     

FAQ's

Do I have to do PlayBox # 1 to do PlayBox # 2?

Nope!  You can do PlayBox # 2 even if you didn't do PlayBox # 1, but if you're intrigued, now is a great time to snap up both. PlayBoxes are open for sale for a limited time and then close again.  All PlayBox sales close this time on Tuesday August 27th, 2019. 

When will PlayBox # 2 ship?

This is a pre-order - the mills are spinning the yarn just for us. We expect to ship in mid-late September, 2019!

I want multiple colorways - is there a discount?

Yep! Since the pattern is the same for all colorways, you only pay for the pattern once. The first PlayBox # 2 you buy is $100, and any subsequent PlayBox #2 you purchase is $90 each. The same is true for PlayBox # 1 - the first you buy is $105, and any subsequent PlayBox #1 you purchase in the same order is $95 each. Buying *one* PlayBox # 1 and *one* PlayBox # 2 doesn't get you the discount (because you are paying for each pattern). 

PlayBox# 1 Discount Codes

  • 2WOOLBOXES ($10 off your total order for two wool PlayBoxes)
  • 3WOOLBOXES ($20 off your total order for three wool PlayBoxes)
  • 4WOOLBOXES ($30 off your total order for four wool PlayBoxes)
  • 5WOOLBOXES ($40 off your total order for five wool PlayBoxes)

PlayBox # 2 Discount Codes

  • 2COTTONBOXES ($10 off your total order for two of PlayBox # 2)
  • 3COTTONBOXES ($20 off your total order for three of PlayBox # 2)
  • 4COTTONBOXES ($30 off your total order for four of PlayBox # 2)

Is this a subscription box? Or just one box? 

This is Box # 2 in a series of boxes - each box focuses on a different type of project and material. You don't subscribe - you can choose which Box or Boxes you'd like when they are released.

It sold out before I got a chance to purchase! Why? When can I get a box? 

We are working with small US mills and supplies are very limited. But we don't want any sad weavers out there! We will release the PlayBoxes again - you can sign up to be notified when they are back in stock. Email hello@gistyarn.com with any questions.

How much does it cost to ship in the US? 

Shipping is usually $12-15 in the US (exact amount depending on location - we ship from Boston). We also offer free US shipping on all orders over $135, so if you want to add a bit more yarn or other weaving supplies to your box, you can qualify yourself for free shipping.

Do you ship internationally? 

We will happily ship it to you internationally - we ship everywhere! Please note that international customers are responsible for all taxes and duties. Shipping cost varies by destination - you can find your cost by adding the box to your cart and starting the checkout process. 

What equipment do I need? 

rigid heddle loom with a 10 dent reed, with at least 10" weaving width, pickup sticks, and stick shuttles

I want to get started with rigid heddle weaving - which loom should I choose? 

This free downloadable guide will introduce you to the basics! And send an email to hello@gistyarn.com and we'll help you get started with a first loom. 

I'm brand new to rigid heddle weaving - should I get the Weaver's PlayBox? 

We recommend you weave at least 1 or 2 projects to get the feel of your loom before trying the Weaver's PlayBox. Here's a great first project you can weave! Since you will have about a month until the PlayBox is delivered, you can definitely go ahead and order it now - just make sure you try some other projects before diving into your PlayBox. 

Do you offer the box in different colors? 

Yep! By popular demand, we are offering the PlayBox in four different colorways right off the bat. If you're someone who likes to follow a pattern exactly, we encourage you to buy the Original colorway, as that's what all of the instructions and photos are based off of.  

I have another question! Who do I ask? 

Please send an email to hello@gistyarn.com

Weaver's PlayBox for Beginning and Intermediate Rigid Heddle Loom Weavers
August 14, 2019 —

Agnes Martin Scarf

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                 
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     

Agnes Martin Scarf 

This lightweight summer scarf is woven with Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn in plain weave with skip dent details. The soft hues and crisscrossed stripes throughout the cloth are reminiscent of paintings by abstract expressionist Agnes Martin

Designed by Mariah Gaar for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                    

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 3 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn 

Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 2-4 shaft table or floor loom, or rigid heddle loom*, 10 or 15 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins 
  • EPI: 15 (10 dent reed threaded 1,2) 
  • Width at Reed: 16" (slightly wider due to skip dent technique) 
  • Warp Ends: 243
  • Warp Length: 3 yards
  • Draft: Plain weave 
  • Technique: Skip dent
  • Finished Dimensions: 15" W x 60" L with 5" fringe on each side
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch 
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash warm with mild soap, hang to dry, press as needed
  • Note: *If you are using a rigid heddle loom and do not have a 15 dent heddle, adjust the EPI to 12 or 12.5 depending on the size heddle that you have on hand
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                    

Weaving & Finishing 

Warp Color Order: Wind a warp in the following sequence for a total of 243 warp ends. 

  • Color A - 60 ends
  • Color B - 54 ends 
  • Color C - 15 ends
  • Color B - 54 ends 
  • Color A - 60 ends 

Skip Dent Technique: The subtle spaces in the warp come from a simple technique called "skip dent", where a dent or two is skipped throughout the reed as you are threading. Mariah uses this technique between each color transition throughout the warp. When you reach the last two threads of one color and the first 2 threads of the next color, complete the following sequence: 

15 dent reed: skip 1, thread 2, skip 1, thread 2, skip 1

10 dent reed: Follow the same sequence as above but do not forget to continue with your 1,2 threading in between the skipped dents

See photo for clarification. Repeat this step in between each warp stripe. 

Weft Color Order: Begin and end the scarf with hemstitch

Block 1

  • Color A - 3.5"
  • Color B - 3.5" 
  • Color C - 1"
  • Color B - 1"
  • Color C - 1"
  • Color B - 1"
  • Color C - 1"
  • Color B - 3.5" 
  • Color C - 5" 

Block 2 - Repeat this block twice

  • Color B - 2 picks
  • Color C - 2 picks 
  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 2 picks 
  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 1" 

Block 3

  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 2 picks
  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 2 picks 
  • Color B - 2 picks 
  • Color C - 3.5" 
  • Color A - 4 picks 
  • Color C - 1 pick 
  • Color A - 1 pick
  • Color C - 1 pick 
  • Color A - 1 pick 
  • Color C - 1 pick*
  • Color A - 4 picks 
  • Mirror this sequence for the second half of the scarf starting with *
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Handwoven Minimalist Cotton and Linen Scarf
                     

Variations 

  • Create your own stripe pattern throughout the warp and weft 
  • Experiment with the skip dent technique placement as you are threading the reed 

About Mariah Gaar 

"I have a background in Studio Art -- specifically in fibers and graphic design. In my own work, I aim to create access to heirloom quality textiles. I explore various natural fibers and color combinations to make something worthy of holding on to. I focus on the juxtaposition between art and function - and try to find the balance between the two. Weaving is my passion and I enjoy continuing to learn more about this medium every day."

Weaving Projects by Mariah Gaar 

Website | Instagram 

Mariah Gaar
July 31, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Introducing Mallo - Now Open for Pre-Order

This gorgeous thick and thin cotton slub yarn is sure to be a new favorite. Suitable for warp and weft, this wonderful textured yarn is great for throws, baby blankets, absorbent towels, waffle weave...the possibilities are endless. Use it on a rigid heddle, table, or floor loom. Recommended sett of 10-16 epi.
July 29, 2019 —

Duet Boxy Top

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                    

Duet Boxy Top 

The Duet Boxy Top is woven with 4 colors of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn on a rigid heddle loom and then sewn by hand into a versatile and one-of-a-kind garment. 

Designed by Lois Weaver for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                    
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                    

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 5 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

O'Keeffe

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Cassatt

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Kahlo

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: Rigid Heddle Loom (24"+ weaving width), 12 dent reedshuttle & bobbins or stick shuttles
  • EPI: 12
  • PPI: 12
  • Width at Reed: 20"
  • Warp Ends: 240
  • Warp Length: 115" 
  • Draft: Plain weave
  •  Finished Dimensions: (Before sewing) 2 panels 36" L x 18 ¼” W + 2" fringe on each side
  • Finishing Details: See finishing and sewing instructions below
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash warm with mild soap, hang to dry, press as needed
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                    
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     

Weaving & Finishing 

Lois writes, "For this project, I’ve gradated stripes by alternating one thread of one color with one thread of the next color. This visually blends the colors between stripes. You may choose to skip this part outlined in the color threading chart below, and simply warp solid stripes for a bolder look. If using a rigid heddle loom, I recommend the indirect warping method." 

Color A = StormColor B = SantoriniColor C = PearColor D = Chambray

Warp Color Order: Wind your warp in the following order for a total of 240 warp ends.

  • 20 ends Color A 
  • 18 ends Color B
  • 10 ends Color C
  • 20 ends Color D
  • 26 ends Color B
  • 24 ends Color A
  • 22 ends Color B
  • 26 ends Color C
  • 26 ends Color D
  • 28 ends Color B
  • 20 ends Color A 

Threading Sequence: To create a gradation throughout the stripes in your warp, follow the threading sequence below.

Weft Color Order: This project is woven as two 38” long panels on one warp. Add a 10" spacer with contrasting yarn between the two panels which will be removed later for fringe. Always measure the woven length with the loom off tension.

Panel 1: 

  • 12" Color B
  • 2" Color C 
  • 4 picks Color B
  • ¾” Color C 
  • Finish weaving this section with Color B until your weaving measures 38"

Spacer: Add a 10" spacer between the 2 panels with contrasting yarn

Panel 2: 

  • 38" Color B 

Finishing: Lois writes, "Measure the two woven panels. If they aren’t both exactly the same length, pull a few weft threads out of the longer panel before tying the fringe. Tie four threads together across in an overhand knotted fringe. Trim some of the excess length off of the fringe before wet finishing to prevent tangling. Hand wash in a warm bath with a mild detergent. Hang to dry. Give it a good steam press. Trim fringe to 2”.

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     
Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top
                     

Sewing Instructions

Lois writes, "This top is generous enough in width to fit most sizes. To make a longer version, use a wider loom or weave a second warp to add to the bottom for length. If you want more width through the bust line, weave longer panels. This is a simple project which requires no sewing machine. All seams are hand stitched. Of course, a sewing machine could be used if you prefer instead of hand stitching." 

Sewn Dimensions: 36" W x 18 ¼” L in the front and back

Shoulder Seams: Following the steps below and using Color A yarn, you will stitch the shoulder edges together from the fringed edge to 6 ¼” on either side of the marked center (total neck opening is 12 ½”).

1.  Lay panels flat, side by side with centers matched and selvedge edges together. Weft stripe will be on the left side of front panel. 

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Center mark

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Measure 6 ¼” from center on both sides so that the neck opening measures a total 12 ½” wide

2.  You will begin sewing the shoulders at one of the fringed edges. Before you begin, on the underside needle weave approximately 1” towards the selvedge edge of the fabric. Backstitch to secure the thread.

3.  Stitch by picking up selvedge loops only, pulling panels together loosely. If selvedge loops are not equal, periodically pick up two loops together on the longer side to even it out.

4.  At both sides of neck opening, needle weave and backstitch on the underside as in the beginning and secure the stress points at the neck edge with a few extra stitches.

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Securing the thread before sewing the shoulder seams

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Sewing the shoulder seams

Side Seams: With wrong sides together, match up fringed edges. Using a length of Color B, this time stitch through both panels close to the fringe from the bottom edge a total of 9 ½ “. Begin and end as in shoulder seams.

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Sewing the side seams

Handwoven Cotton & Linen Boxy Summer Top

Finished!

Lois writes, "Many things inspire my designs. This time it was the new Duet yarn that had just arrived in my studio. The colors are vibrant and some of my favorites to wear. The slubby yarn of cotton and linen was just inviting me to weave a summer top. We were scheduled to leave town for a lengthy vacation a week or so later, and I certainly didn’t want to wait until I got home to try out this yarn. Adrenalin kicked in and I quickly designed, wove and sewed the top. I wanted to make a simple garment that required minimal tools and yet was attractive and comfortable to wear. And now I have a new piece to pack along, perfect for a cool evening on my summer vacation."

About

Lois Weaver has been weaving professionally in one way or another for 25 years. After quitting her day job at midlife and enrolling in a fiber arts program, weaving called to her and she never looked back. It has taken her from selling her wares in shows and galleries in Virginia to production weaving in Colorado. After moving to New Mexico, she began teaching. This led to designing patterns for her students. She now sells her patterns through her Etsy shop. Her specialty has always been wearables. 

Lois now lives in Pueblo, Colorado.  When she’s not in her studio there, you will find her with her husband and Cocker Spaniel traveling in their recently renovated RV complete with her handwoven textiles looking for fiber events and other adventures. 

Follow Lois on Facebook & Instagram

Lois Weaver
July 26, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Here is a project for intermediate-advanced weavers, designed by Elisabeth Hill and woven with Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn in a variety of vibrant colors. These towels are woven on an 8 shaft loom, but Elisabeth also adapted the draft to be suitable for 4 shaft looms. In the project notes below you will see the instructions for both 4 shaft and 8 shaft looms. There is also a plain weave variation of these towels and the option to add additional accent colors to the design. 

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels
                     
Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels
                     

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 5 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Fluorescent

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Peacock

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

8 shaft Deflected Doubleweave towels + plain weave variation (see below) in Pear, Storm and Cerise with Santorini as an accent color

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

8 shaft Deflected Doubleweave towels in Pear, Storm and Cerise with Santorini as an accent color

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 or 8 shaft table or floor loom, 12 dent reed, 2 shuttles, 4 bobbins 
  • EPI: 18 (1,2 in a 12 dent reed) 
  • PPI: 18 
  • Width at Reed: 22" (4 shaft) or 22.25" (8 shaft) 
  • Warp Ends: 396 (4 shaft) or 400 (8 shaft) 
  • Warp Length: 3 yards 
  • Draft: Deflected Doubleweave by Elisabeth Hill 
  •  Finished Dimensions: Set of 2 towels measuring approximately 19" x 31" each after washing, drying & hemming
  • Finishing Details: Hand sewn hem 
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash warm with mild soap, hang to dry, press as needed
Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Weaving & Finishing 

1.  Wind a warp of 396 ends (4 shaft) or 400 ends (8 shaft) 3 yards long following the color order below. Use your preferred method to warp the loom and thread following the draft below. Sley 1,2 per dent in a 12-dent reed, centering for a weaving width of 22" (4 shaft) or 22.25" (8 shaft).

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Warp color order for 4 shaft draft

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Warp color order for 8 shaft draft

2.  Wind one bobbin of each of the warp colors. 

3.  Click here for a youtube video on how to create the double selvedges.

4.  If you prefer, measure out 2 floating selvedges in Cerise (Color A), sley in the outermost dents and weight off the back of the loom. Do not thread in heddles. 

5.  Weave 8 picks of plain weave using a fine thread for the inner hem, then begin weaving according to the draft below. Notice that you will be using 2 treadles at a time for this project. 

6.  Continue weaving according to the draft or for your designed length. Finish with 8 picks in plain weave using a fine yarn for the 2nd inner hem. 

7.  Weave 2 picks of a contrast yarn and begin and end the second towel as you did the first with 8 picks of plain weave in a finer yarn for the inner hems. Optional: Substitute Santorini (Color D) for Storm (Color C) in the weft for your second towel. 

8.  Cut project off the loom and serge or zig zag the raw edges. Elisabeth writes, "For the first wash, I recommend hand washing in warm water with a mild soap, roll in a towel to remove excess water and hang to dry. When damp, iron until dry and hand hem. I turned the hems to create horizontal stripes on towel 1 and vertical on towel 2. You may machine wash and dry after this first wash, but I find that my machine will create difficult creases if I use it for the first wash of any project that uses linen."

8 Shaft Draft 

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

4 Shaft Draft

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels

Plain Weave Variation

To weave a set of towels in plain weave, choose any color sequence you like. Elisabeth wove checks for the first third using Storm (Color C) and Pear (Color B), created a divider using Cerise (Color A) and Santorini (Color D) and wove the rest in Storm (Color C). 

Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels
                   
Free Pattern Handwoven Cotton and Linen Deflected Doubleweave Towels
                     

About

Elisabeth (Lisa) Hill has been weaving for over 20 years, received her master weaver certification from the Hill Institute in 2012, has been a tech editor for Handwoven magazine, a faculty member at Vavstuga weaving school and a workshop leader for guilds and conferences across the country. She lives in Western Mass with her wonderful family and her very bad dog.

Website | Instagram 

Elisabeth Hill
July 19, 2019 — Emma Rhodes