Journal – GIST: Yarn & Fiber
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Summer and Winter Tea Towels

Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather

Summer and Winter Tea Towels 

Weave a set of timeless linen tea towels designed by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather. These towels are woven with our favorite Linen Weaving Yarn and Japanese Sparkly Weaving Yarn for an unexpected hint of shimmer. Whitney has provided us with her variation of a classic Summer and Winter weaving draft, so don't let the name of these towels fool you - they are perfect for all seasons and occasions! 

Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     

Materials

Warp Yarn: 1 cone Linen Weaving Yarn in Silver, 1 cone Linen Weaving Yarn in Cream

Weft Yarn: Remaining warp yarn & 1 cone of Japanese Sparkly Weaving Yarn in Silver

Kits: Each kit includes enough yarn to weave a set of 4 tea towels that measure approximately 16" W x 28" L

Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4-shaft table or floor loom, shuttles & bobbins 
  • EPI: 20
  • Width at Reed: 19"
  • Warp Ends: 382 (selvedge yarns doubled)
  • Warp Length: 6 yards 
  • Draft: Summer Winter Pairs from The Handweaver's Pattern Directory, pg. 144 (updated and adapted by Whitney)
  • Finished Dimensions: A set of 4 towels that measure approximately 16" W x 28" L each
  • Finishing Details: Rolled hem on both ends of 1/2" initial fold followed by 3/4" second fold
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash, lay flat to dry 
Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
                     

Warp Color Order

Color A = Silver Linen Weaving Yarn

Color B = Cream Linen Weaving Yarn

Color C = Silver Sparkly Weaving Yarn 

Warp Color Order: 

  • 20 ends (+1 for doubled selvedge) of Color A 
  • 20 ends of Color B
  • 20 ends of Color A 
  • 20 ends of Color B 
  • Continue this pattern for a total of 382 warp ends, finishing with 20 ends (+1 for doubled selvedge) of Color A 

Weaving & Finishing

Start and end with a plain weave hem (about 2")

  • 16 picks Color A
  • 3 picks Color C 
  • 20 picks Color A 

Next you will begin to weave alternating blocks of Summer and Winter. (See draft below). Note that this draft only shows pattern picks. For each pattern pick woven you should alternate with a tabby pick of the opposite color. For more information on Summer and Winter, check out this post by Melissa Ludden Hankens on the Schacht Spindle Company website. Each color block should measure about 1". 

Once you have woven about 28", finish with another 2" of plain weave hem following the sequence above. Repeat the process for your next towel(s). 

Cut your towels off the loom. To best preserve the fabric, hand wash in cold water with a mild soap and air dry. Press (be careful that the iron isn't too hot for the sections with the sparkly yarn) and cut apart the towels and finish each plain weave edge with a hand sewn rolled hem. 

Whitney writes, "I really loved working with this linen yarn. I tend to lean toward fibers with a slightly drier, crisper hand anyway, and this was right in my wheelhouse. Using it as warp was virtually problem-free; the tension was even, the shed was clear. I loved it. And the drape on these is pretty great. I can only imagine that they will become even more sumptuous as they're used and washed." 

Writing it twice so you don't miss it!  Note that this draft only shows pattern picks. For each pattern pick woven you should alternate with a tabby pick of the opposite color.

About the Artist

Whitney Crutchfield is the founder and textile artist behind WE GATHER, a Brooklyn-based brand of hand-dyed handwoven textiles and educational textile studio. She has been weaving and dyeing her own textiles for over 10 years, creating custom projects for residential interiors and installations for public spaces. Whitney works to create beautiful textiles that last, and she teaches others about the sheer delight of fabric at FIT and through workshop programming in the WE GATHER studio and in corporate and private venues around the country. 

Follow @wegather on Instagram to learn more! 

Free Pattern to Weave a Set of Linen Tea Towels by Whitney Crutchfield of We Gather
December 05, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

Weaving Inspiration

Weaving Inspiration

Here is a selection of weaving projects that are inspiring us this week. Want to be featured? Send us an email or tag your weaving photos with #gistyarn on Instagram! 

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

Hand woven wall hanging by Andrea Carpenter of The Winter PhoenixI Am Saying Something, and You Don't Want to Listen 

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                    
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

Hand woven wall hanging by Andrea Carpenter of The Winter Pheonix |Untitled 

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                    
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

A beautiful hand woven and hand sewn top by Melissa Hankens

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

Process photos by Maria Magdalena Ma of Black Birch Textiles.

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

A hand woven, hand sewn top and scarf by Maria Magdalena Ma of Black Birch Textiles.

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     
Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
                     

This scarf woven by Rachel Snack of Weaver House Co. was inspired by Sarah Eller's Silk Road Scarf featured on our blog earlier this year. 

Inspired? 

Here are a few of the yarns featured in these beautiful projects. Happy Weaving!


Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber

Italian Cotton/Linen 

Gorgeous 50/50 blend of cotton and linen weaving yarn that I import directly from Italy. It is spun and dyed at a small family-run mill in Florence and isn't available for sale anywhere else in the US.

Huge skein that is almost 1 lb. (400 grams). 3,000 yards.  Recommended epi of 18-24.


Linen 

This gorgeous wetspun linen yarn comes directly from a mill in northern Lithuania that has been spinning linen yarn for 88 years. Perfect for making hand towels and table runners.

1 lb. cones of 18/3 linen, 3,300 ypp. 32 wpi with a recommended sett of 16-22 epi.

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber



Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber

Camel Silk 

This luxurious blend of silk and camel fiber is patiently waiting for whatever you're dreaming up. 70% silk, 30% camel. 100% gorgeous hand and texture. A soft camel color that can be used as is or dyed with acid or natural dyes. 

Made in Canada. 1/2 lb. cone has 750 yards. 20 wpi, recommended sett of 10-15 epi. 


8/2 Cotton

This 8/2 un-mercerized cotton weaving yarn is perfect for dish towels, hand towels, placemats, and tablecloths. It is absorbent, washable, and durable cotton weaving yarn. Made in Canada.

3,360 yards per lb. Recommended sett of 15-30 epi. Comes on a 1/2 lb tube with 1,680 yards. 

Weaving Inspiration Gist Yarn and Fiber
November 29, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Brooks Bouquet Curtains 

Weave an elegant pair of curtains designed by Erin Supinski for her Brooklyn home. These curtains are woven with a few of our favorite undyed yarns including Silk / Ramie10/2 Silk Noil, and Fine Paper Weaving Yarn. The light, airy texture is complemented by Brooks Bouquet detailing and filters light beautifully. 

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Materials 

This pattern is designed to weave a pair of curtains that measure 35.5" W x 69" L. If your windows are similar in size we recommend purchasing one kit. If your windows are considerably larger or you would like to make multiple pairs, we recommend purchasing two kits.



Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 2-4 shaft loom12 dent reedshuttle & bobbins
  • EPI: 16 (threaded in a 12 dent reed 2-1-1-2-1-1)
  • Width at Reed: 39.625" 
  • Warp Ends: 634
  • Warp Length: 8 yards
  • Length on the Loom: Approximately 200" (100" each panel to account for shrinkage and hemming) 
  • PPI: 16
  • Draft: Plain Weave 
  •  Finishing Details: Wet finished and sewn into 2 panels that measure approximately 69" L x 35.5" W with a doubled 5" bottom hem and a doubled 1 1/2" rod pocket. Each panel measures about 83" before cutting and hemming.
  •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, air dry, steam or iron on lowest setting as needed.
  • Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         

    Weaving and Finishing

    Erin writes, "I wanted to make sheer, airy curtains focusing on the textures of the different yarns, so I sett my project loosely, and in the warp I alternated big stripes of the UKI cotton (five stripes) and the Brassard cotton (six stripes) at 54 ends each. In between these thicker stripes I alternated thin stripes of four ends each of the silk/ramie and silk noil, for a total of 10 skinny stripes (five stripes of each). I made sure to have enough yarn in the warp to do a sample in order to try different techniques and to calculate shrinkage after washing." 

    Yarn A = UKI 8/2 Un-mercerized Cotton Weaving Yarn

    Yarn B = 8/2 Un-mercerized Brassard Weaving Yarn

    Yarn C = Silk / Ramie Weaving Yarn

    Yarn D = 10/2 Silk Noil Weaving Yarn

    Yarn E = White Fine Paper Weaving Yarn 

    Wind a warp repeating the following sequence 5 times, and then wind 54 ends of Yarn A, for a total of 634 warp ends: 

    • 54 ends of Yarn A 
    • 4 ends of Yarn C
    • 54 ends of Yarn B 
    • 4 ends of Yarn D

    "For the weft I again alternated the wider stripes, 51 picks each at 16 ppi, of the UKI and Brassard, and I added in a wide stripe of the fine paper. In between the UKI and Brassard I did a skinny stripe of the silk/ramie, and on either side of the paper yarn I did a stripe of the silk noil. Each skinny stripe was 4 picks each. The overall effect was a windowpane plaid in different textures of yarn." 

    Repeat the following sequence for each panel: 

    • 51 picks of Yarn A
    • 4 picks Yarn C
    • 51 picks Yarn B 
    • 4 picks Yarn D
    • 51 picks Yarn E
    • 4 picks Yarn D

    "I randomly chose some of the wider stripes and inlaid some brooks bouquet. I wove three picks in the stripe then went four ends into each stripe, wrapped around the next five ends, wove the the next five, wrapped the next five and so on until there were four ends left, and then I wove the rest of the row. Then I wove four picks, and on the fifth pick I staggered the wraps, so I wove nine ends, wrapped five, wove five ends, wrapped five, and so on until there were nine ends left in the stripe. Then I wove the rest of the row. I repeated these on every fifth pick nine times for a total of 48 picks in the stripe, then I wove the last three picks (for a total of 51 in the stripe), and switched yarn for the skinny stripe. (The pictures I included may help clarify this a bit...)"

    For more information on Brooks Bouquet see this tutorial on the Schacht Spindle Company website. 

    "I made sure each panel was at least 100" long to account for shrinkage, and to give enough fabric to sew the hem and rod pocket, but I like to give myself extra wiggle room, so I wove an extra 15" overall, so I would have enough to make sure my stripes lined up across both panels.

    Then I cut the fabric off the loom, soaked it in the bathtub with some Woolite and warm water, and ironed it until it was dry. I then cut each panel to 83" making sure the stripes lined up as closely as possible. For the rod pockets I ironed the top down 1 1/2", and then I folded that down another 1 1/2", pressed, and sewed. For the hem, I pressed 5", then folded up another 5", pressed, and sewed. I like using double hems because it makes the curtains feel more substantial. Then I used a tension rod and hung them in my window—done!"

    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

    About the Artist 

    Formally trained as a graphic designer and illustrator, Erin Supinski spends all of her free time weaving from her home studio in Brooklyn. Drawn to the tactility of weaving and primarily self-taught, she has been weaving since 2014. She loves to create items that are functional, simple, and beautiful out of natural materials.

    To see more of Erin's work and process check out her Instagram

    Erin Supinski Artist Bio
    November 14, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Buffalo Check Blanket

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket

    Buffalo Check Blanket

    This week Maddison Wilkerson of West Domestic has shared with us a modern approach to the classic buffalo check blanket. Woven with a blend of our 8/4 Un-mercerized Brassard Cotton Weaving Yarn and Italian Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn, this blanket is rich with color and texture -- a true heirloom piece.

    Maddison writes, "Traditionally, Buffalo Check is woven with identical warp and weft stripes, using the same threads for both to create solid blocks of color. But by using slightly different colored threads, there was a little more depth to the weaving. The Natural color is a creamier with Sand [Italian Cotton Linen] woven in, and the Navy Blue becomes a bit brighter when the Midnight [Italian Cotton Linen] is mixed in. I love how it turned out!"

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                        
    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                         

    Materials

    Warp: 4 cones 8/4 Un-mercerized Brassard Cotton Weaving Yarn (2 of each color)

    Weft: 2 skeins Italian Cotton/Linen Weaving Yarn (1 of each color)

    Kits: Each kit includes enough yarn to make a blanket that measures approximately 50" W x 70" L + fringe. 

    Want to make this project but don't have such a wide loom? Adapt this project to a smaller width loom and make a throw blanket!

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket

    New Bedford

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket

    Portland

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket

    Rockport

    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                         

    Project Notes

    •  Tools Required: 4 shaft floor loom with 60" weaving width,  shuttle & bobbins, fringe twister
    •  EPI: 15 (use a 15 dent reed or thread 2-1-2-1 on a 10 dent reed)
    •  Width at Reed: 60" 
    •  Warp Ends: 900 ends 
    •  Warp Length: 3 yards
    •  Draft: Balanced Twill 
    •  Finished Dimensions: Approximately 50" W x 70" L with 6" fringe on each side (after washing)
    •  Finishing Details: Twisted fringe
    •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with mild detergent, air dry or tumble dry low
    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Classic Buffalo Check Blanket
                       

    Pattern 

    Color A = Natural 8/4 Un-mercerized Brassard Cotton 

    Color B = Navy Blue 8/4 Un-mercerized Brassard Cotton

    Color C = Midnight Italian Cotton/Linen 

    Color D = Sand Italian Cotton/Linen

    Warp Color Order: Each stripe band is 100 ends. You will have 4 stripes of Color A (400 ends) and 5 stripes of Color B (500 ends). Each stripe will be about 6.5" wide.

    • 100 warp ends of Color B 
    • 100 warp ends of Color A 
    • 100 warp ends of Color B 
    • 100 warp ends of Color A  
    • 100 warp ends of Color B  
    • 100 warp ends of Color A 
    • 100 warp ends of Color B 
    • 100 warp ends of Color A  
    • 100 warp ends of Color B 

    Weft Color Order: Maddison writes, " The warp stripes are about 6.5” wide, so I wove each weft stripe about 6.25”. (Remember that the warp is pulled tight and will bounce back a bit once cut off the loom, so the weft stripes don’t need to be quite as wide.)

    Leave at least 6” for fringe, then begin weaving with [Color C]  for 6.25”. Change bobbins and weave with [Color D] for 6.25”. Weave in this pattern until the end (about 70"). Once pulled off the loom I had 7 blue stripes and 6 natural stripes."

    Finishing: Maddison writes, " Cut blanket off the loom and finish the ends. I like to use a thick twisted fringe. Wash cold and dry on low heat. Enjoy! 

    This pattern can easily be modified to create a scarf, table runner or tea towels. The 8/4 Un-mercerized Brassard Cotton was a dream warp--not a single broken thread! And the Italian Cotton/Linen is a great price; I still have plenty leftover for another project." 

    About the Artist

    Maddi Wilkerson has been weaving since 2013. She currently works in her home studio in Lexington, Kentucky. 

    "West Domestic came from the idea to create beautiful and useful woven heirlooms in my home for yours. The desire to create, and to share your creations, is something that's been passed down through many generations of Wests. Through my work I hope to honor my family's spirit of hospitality and creativity."

    You can find more of her work on her website or Instagram

    November 07, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Introducing Duet

    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn
                  
    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn
                     

    Introducing Duet

    A beautiful, textured yarn designed especially for weavers. 

    2 slubby plies of US grown cotton + 1 ply of French tow linen. Strong enough for warp, soft enough to wear next to skin, and hardy enough for kitchen towels. Recommended sett of 12-16 epi (making a lovely, drapey fabric with a 12-dent reed on a rigid heddle loom). Truly a versatile yarn that we hope will become a beloved staple on your loom for many kinds of projects. 

    Spun at Huntingdon Yarn Mill in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and dyed at Spartan Dyers in Belmont, North Carolina. Anything you create with Duet will tell the story of the soul of place - the fields where it is grown, the mill where it is the spun, the colors that bring it to life.

    Duet Yarn Pre-Order

    $63 ~ 3 Cones

    Buy 3 cones of Duet 
    + a free Color Card 

    ($79 value) 

    Pre-Order Now

    $126 ~ 7 Cones

    Buy 6 cones of Duet 
    Get 1 free
     + a free Color Card 
    ($162 value)

    Pre-Order Now

    $210 ~ 12 Cones

    Buy 10 cones of Duet 
    Get 2 Free
    + a free Color Card 
    ($267 value)

    Pre-Order Now

    55% linen / 45% cotton. 2,390 ypp. Suitable for warp and weft, on rigid heddle, table, and floor looms. Recommended sett of 12-16 epi. Comes on ¼ lb. cones with 600 yards per cone.

    Why Pre-Orders?

    So, why not wait until the yarn is ready to ship before starting to sell it?

    The answer is pretty simple...I can’t! Starting a new line of yarn requires a pretty hefty deposit so that I can meet the minimum order quantities for the yarn mill. My little shop has been growing steadily (because of *your* support, so thank you!) but as a small, boot-strapped business without investors or deep pockets, I can’t quite float this on my own. I could have waited a few years, slowly saving up for the deposit...but I know how much you all are going to love this yarn, and I wanted to see if we could find a way to bring it to you faster.

    That’s why I’m turning to you, dear weaving community - will you invest in bringing this yarn to life? By pre-ordering, you’ll play a direct role in making this yarn possible, helping us bring it to the looms of weavers everywhere, and supporting US textile manufacturing in the process. Plus all pre-orders will get a free color card of Duet, and first pick of color choices before anyone else can order (guaranteeing that your preferred colors won’t be sold out).

    I expect to ship this yarn in March-April 2019. Hopefully it will ship sooner, but as with any manufacturing process, delays could happen. I appreciate your patience and support.

    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn

    Color Development

    We are excited to be developing a color story featuring complementary hues, meant to play well together or shine on their own. These photos give you a glimpse into that color development process, but are not the final options. When the yarn is ready, you will be sent photos of the full line of yarn and will choose your colors then. Pre-ordering guarantees that your color choice will be in stock, and you will receive your yarn before it is available to everyone else.

    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn

    About Huntingdon Yarn Mill

    Huntingdon Yarn Mill, a family-run business owned by Fay and Majid Jaraha, has been continuously operating making yarn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania since 1940.  Many of their 50 employees live in the same neighborhood as the mill, and include siblings, spouses and family members of multiple generations working together. When I called Fay last spring to inquire about working with her mill for this line of yarn, she couldn’t have been more friendly, encouraging, and generous with her time as she walked me through the process of creating this yarn. I am so proud to be working with Huntingdon Yarn Mill to create Duet.

    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn Huntingdon Mill

    About Spartan Dyers

    Spartan Dyers is a family-run dye house in Belmont, North Carolina. It was founded in 1988 by Alphonse Kelada, and is now owned and operated by his son George Kelada. They have state-of-the-art dyeing and production facilities, and will be package-dyeing Duet with fiber reactive dyes. Package dyeing is a method of dyeing that uses dramatically less water than skein dyeing, and fiber reactive dyes are widely known to be the most washfast and lightfast, and least toxic synthetic dye for cellulose fibers. I am excited to be working with Spartan Dyers to create a line of colors that will make Duet truly shine.

    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn Spartan Dyers
                         
    Duet Cotton Linen Weaving Yarn by Gist Yarn Spartan Dyers
                         

    Wholesale

    Is your yarn shop interested in carrying Duet? We'd love to work with you!

    November 01, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Color Field Scarf

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         

    Color Field Scarf 

    The Color Field Scarf is woven with one of the most scrumptious textured yarns in our shop, silk noil. The beautiful sister to shinier bombyx silk, this yarn is made from the remnants of silk after the carding process. This gives it a lovely matte feel, and makes a scarf suitable for men and women. 

    The vibrant colors blend together to create a variety of gem tone hues, and the soft texture of the silk adds dimension to the weave structure. Weave this on your rigid heddle, table, or floor loom. Grab a couple of kits if you're in holiday planning season - these will make cherished gifts!

    Materials

    Warp & Weft: 3 skeins of Italian Silk Noil Weaving Yarn or 1 skein of 10/2 Silk Noil Weaving Yarn and 2 skeins of Italian Silk Noil Weaving Yarn.

    Kits: Each kit contains enough yarn to make a scarf that measures approximately 16" W x 90" L.

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf

    Rothko

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf

    Newman

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf

    Noland

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         

    Project Notes

    •  Tools Required: 2-4 shaft floor loom or rigid heddle loom12 dent reedshuttle & bobbins
    •  EPI: 12
    •  Width at Reed: 16.5"
    •  Warp Ends: 198
    •  Warp Length: 120"
    •  Draft: Tabby Weave 
    •  Finished Dimensions: Approximately 16" W x 90" L + 3" fringe on each side
    •  Finishing Details: Hem stitch
    •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with mild detergent, lay flat to dry
    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         

    Pattern

    Color A = Midnight, Color B = Denim, Color C = Emerald 

    Warp Color Order: Wind a warp following this sequence for a total of 198 warp ends. 

    • 5.5" of Color A
    • 5.5" of Color B
    • 5.5" of Color C 

    Weft Color Order: Weave the following color block sequence for a total of 90". Measure the length of your stripes when the loom is not under tension for the most accurate measurement. Begin and end your scarf with hem stitch (tutorial here) and make sure to leave enough room for fringe. 

    • 18" of Color A 
    • 18" of Color B
    • 18" of Color C 
    • 18" of Color A
    • 18" of Color B 

    Variations 

    Experimenting with the warp sett can produce very different results with the exact same yarn. Sarah wove this scarf with a sett of 10 ends per inch vs. the 12 ends per inch in the scarf above. This created a lighter, more airy fabric. 

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
                         

    A subtle gradient was created by warping with the Italian Silk Noil Weaving Yarn in charcoal, followed by midnight and denim.

    Free Pattern to Weave a Silk Noil Color Field Scarf
    October 25, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Frame/Loom

    Warping Frame/Loom 

                        
                         

    Step 1: Thread the warp yarn all the way through the first bottom left hole and first top left hole leaving a tail that is about 5" long. 

                         
                        

    Step 2: Take the tail and thread it through the second hole on the bottom left. 

                         
                         

    Step 3: Tie the tail to the first warp string using a double overhand knot or knot of your choosing. 

    Step 4: Thread the tail back through the first hole on the bottom left.

    Step 5: Pull the knot down into the hole so that it is invisible. Leave the tail string long until you have finished weaving so that you can make any necessary adjustments. 

    Step 6: Continue threading through the top and bottom cross beams all the way through the last hole on the bottom right. Make sure to keep the tension tight throughout.

    Step 7: Thread the remaining warp yarn back through the second hole on the bottom right. 

    Step 8: Secure the tension by tying the remaining warp to the last warp string using a double over hand knot or knot of your choosing. Make sure to use both hands to keep the tension. 

    Step 9: Thread the remaining warp yarn back through the last hole on the bottom right. 

    Step 10: Pull the knot down into the hole so that it is invisible. Leave the tail long until you have finished weaving so that you can make any necessary adjustments.

                     
        
    October 21, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Weaving with Avery Williamson

    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson

    Artist Spotlight - Avery Williamson 

    This week we are highlighting the work of Avery Williamson, an artist, researcher and writer who we had the pleasure of speaking with on the Weave Podcast earlier this year. Using our yarns, Avery created this weaving that is full of movement, color and texture. 

    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
     
    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
                         

    Flesh that Weeps and Laughs | 36" x 14" | 2018 

    "This piece captures dialogue between a young woman and her ancestors. It is called Flesh that Weeps and Laughs.

    I’ve been interested in bloodlines and what we inherit physically and emotionally from our ancestors. I used reds, oranges and pinks, as they felt most reflective of the human body - intestines, blood and flesh. I like to believe that many generations can remain in conversation with each other even after some of us are dead. It’s a constant back-and-forth about music, work, men, politics, women, housework, friendships, partnerships, and what it means to be independent.

    I work in the medium of weaving, and view this piece, and many others, as portraits.  I’m looking at portraiture as something that is not distinct features - noses, ears and skin. These portraits  are not defined or tied to those distinct features. They moments within an ongoing conversation.

    The warp and weft are loose, each time the piece moves location it changes shapes and reveals new compositions. The negative area represents navigating all the spaces we must pass through in order to support ourselves. It is about managing the emotions of others, while still holding space for our own sadness, joy, and anger." - Avery Williamson

    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
                         
    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
                         

    Materials

    Avery's yarn choices are so inspiring and includes some of our all time favorites! If you are interested in this style of weaving, give these yarns a try or check out our collection of yarn bundles.

    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
                         
    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
                         

    About the Artist

    Avery Williamson is an Ann Arbor, MI-based artist. Her work explore show gaps in visual, oral and written documentation can inform the storytelling process. These works take the form of weavings, drawings and painting. 

    Avery earned her B.A. in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard College in 2013.

    To learn more about Avery and her studio practice, listen to episode 7 of the Weave Podcast or visit her website and Instagram

    Featured Artist Weaver Avery Williamson
    October 18, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Weave an Alternating Block Twill Scarf

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    Block Twill Scarf 

    This week we are featuring a warm & cozy alpaca scarf by Morgan Hale. Using three cones of our 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn, Morgan wove this colorful design using alternating twill blocks to create a unique optical illusion. See all the details below and purchase a kit to get started! 

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Materials 

    Warp & Weft: 3 x 1/2 lb cones of 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn

    Kits: Each kit contains enough yarn to weave a scarf that measures approximately 13" W x 84" L (+fringe). You will have plenty of left over yarn to use in other projects, as well. Morgan designed this scarf with a solid color warp and a color blocked weft but feel free to experiment with your own variations of this design. 

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    West Coast

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    Midwest

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    East Coast

    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Project Notes

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft loom, 12 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins
    • EPI: 12
    • Width at Reed: 14" + an extra 8 threads
    • Warp Ends: 176 
    • Warp Length: 3 yards
    • Draft: Alternating Twill Blocks (see draft below)
    • Finished Dimensions: 13" x 84" L (+ fringe)
    • Finishing Details: Knotted 5" fringe on each side
    • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, lay flat to dry
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf
                         

    Pattern 

    Warp: Wind your warp with Color A for a total of 176 warp ends. Feel free to experiment with warp stripes instead of a solid color if that strikes your fancy. 

    Weft Color Order: Repeat the following pattern for a total of 84". Each block of 14" is made up of 10 twill pattern squares.

    • 14" Color B
    • 14" Color A 
    • 14" Color C
    • 14" Color B
    • 14" Color A
    • 14" Color C
    Free Pattern to Weave this Alpaca Block Twill Scarf

    Morgan adapted this Alternating Block Twill draft from a pattern found on handweaving.net. Feel free to adjust the number of repeats depending on how tightly you pack the weft picks. 

    Finishing: Morgan writes, "One thing I noticed with this pattern is that the alternating twill makes it hard to get perfect selvedges. It bothered me a bit while I was weaving but once it’s off the loom, and worn it’s really not noticeable. I chose to do knotted fringe on this scarf even though I usually do a hemstitched edge on most of my scarves. I think the hand knotting gives this scarf a little extra depth." 

    Tip: You can also add 1 floating selvedge to each side to minimize this issue. For more information on floating selvedges, check out this page on the Schacht website. 

    About The Artist 

    Morgan Hale’s work aims to be ethereal and relaxing, evoking a feeling of calm in the viewer. Her pieces focus on melding the texture, pattern and color of mid century and vintage designs with a modern, minimalist aesthetic. 

    While she enjoys working in a variety of mediums, her main focus, and love, is weaving on her large floor loom. She finds the process of weaving relaxing and meditative, and is propelled by its repetitive rhythm and movement. 

    Morgan graduated from Massachusetts College of Art and Design with a BFA in Fine Arts, Fibers. She currently resides and works in New York City.

    Artist Morgan Hale
    October 11, 2018 by Emma Rhodes

    Weave a Rug This Weekend

    Free Pattern Color and Weave Tea Towels on a Rigid Heddle Loom

    Weave this Weekend Rug on your Rigid Heddle or Floor Loom

    This quick handwoven rug designed by Emma Rhodes is a perfect summer project! Get it warped and woven in a weekend, and have a beautiful new rug for for your own home or to give as a gift. Weave it on your floor loom or your rigid heddle loom, with an 8-dent reed. 

    Free Pattern Color and Weave Tea Towels on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                    
    Free Pattern Color and Weave Tea Towels on a Rigid Heddle Loom
                     

    Materials 

    Warp: 1 Cone 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton

    Kits: Each kit contains enough yarn to make one rug 21" x 40" (including 2.5" fringe on each end)

    Project Notes 

    • Tools Required: 4-shaft floor loom or Rigid Heddle loom, 8 dent reed, 12" stick shuttle (Note that the rug will look a bit different (still beautiful) if woven on the Rigid Heddle loom - see notes below)
    • EPI: 8 
    • Width in reed: 24"
    • Warp length: 2 yards
    • Length measured under tension on loom: 36" 
    • Finished Size: 21 x 40" (including 2.5" fringe on both sides) 
    • Finishing details: Hem stitch & twisted fringe

    Pattern

    Four-Shaft Loom Info 
    • Threading: 4-3-2-1
    • Tie up: 1-2,3-4 (this means that two adjacent warp threads will lift together)
    • Treadle: 1,2,1,2 


    Free Pattern Color and Weave Tea Towels on a Rigid Heddle Loom

    Rigid Heddle Loom Info

    Threading: One warp thread per slot/hole. On a rigid heddle loom, you can only do Tabby Weave (you cannot lift two adjacent warp threads together). So in the adaptation for Rigid Heddle looms, the weft thread goes over and under each warp thread. This means that in your final rug, some of the warp thread will also remain visible, resulting in a beautiful interplay between the 8/8 cotton and the wool weft. 

    Emma writes: "I have been weaving for 7 years and this is my first rug! For this project I wanted to weave a simple, weft faced rug that would accentuate the color variations in this Tapestry Rug Wool from Mountain Meadow Wool Mill.

    I wound the skeins into center pull balls and wrapped two strands around the stick shuttle. By weaving with double strands, the variations in the color really begin to pop! The gradation from dark to light reminds me of some of the beautiful denim rag rugs I have seen recently.

    There was more draw-in then I anticipated so you can also go slightly wider at the reed, maybe 26". I love the polished look of hem stitch (tutorial here) and twisted fringe. I am looking forward to working with more colors, patterns and rug sizes in the future!"

    Free Pattern Color and Weave Tea Towels on a Rigid Heddle Loom
    October 04, 2018 by