Free Continental US shipping on $135+ orders!

Running Stitch Towels

Running Stitch Towels

 

Weave a set of towels to match your Running Stitch Napkins with two contrasting colors of Duet Cotton/Linen. This casually elegant motif is woven by alternating warp and weft colors in a specific order to create the illusion of an intricate pattern, also known as color-and-weave.

You can download an updated version of this pattern and purchase a kit here.

Designed by Christine Jablonski for Gist Yarn.

Yarn

Warp: 1 cone of Duet Cotton Linen in Dune and 1 cone of Duet Cotton Linen in Cerise (1/4lb cones, 2,390 yd/lb), approximately 348 yards required - 292 yards Dune, 56 yards Cerise

Weft: Same as warp, approximately 195 yards required - 177 yards Dune, 18 yards Cerise

Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave 2 towels that measure approximately 12" W x 20" L after washing. There will be enough yarn remaining to weave 2 additional towels with the same dimensions if you reverse the colors.

Equipment

Loom: Rigid heddle loom at least 15" wide

Reed: 12 or 12.5 dent

Shuttles: 2 boat shuttles or stick shuttles

Bobbins: 2 (if you are using a boat shuttle)

Other: Sewing machine (optional)

Specifications

 

Technique: Plain weave, color-and-weave

EPI: 12

PPI: 12

Width at Reed: 13.25"

Warp Ends: 174 (146 ends Yarn A, 28 end Yarn B)

Warp Length: 2 yards (includes 44" of weaving for towels plus 28” for loom waste and sampling)

Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 22” per towel

Finishing: Hemstitch or machine stitched hem with frayed edge

Finished Size: 2 towels measuring 12” W x 20” L after washing and hemming 

Care: Machine wash cold on delicate cycle, air dry or tumble dry low, press as needed

 

Instructions

 

 

 

1. Warp the loom using your preferred method (direct or indirect) with a total of 174 warp ends, 2 yards long, following the warp color order below. Center for a weaving width of 13.25". Please note, if you direct warp on a rigid heddle loom, your warp will be 14.5” in the reed and decrease by 14 spaces when you thread each doubled Yarn B into single slots or holes. This will cause your warp to be slightly off center, so you can move the warp over a few spaces as you thread to center it in the reed.

  • 2 ends Yarn A sleyed with a single thread per hole or slot
  • 2 ends Yarn B (held together as one) sleyed with both threads in the same hole or slot
  • Repeat these steps 13 more times. There will be 14 stripes (28 ends, since Yarn B is doubled) of Yarn B in the warp
  • 118 ends Yarn A sleyed with a single thread in a hole or slot

2. Begin and end each towel with hemstitch, if that is your preferred method. You can also machine stitch each edge when you have finished weaving (as pictured). Weave following the weft color order below.

  • 4 picks of Yarn A in alternating sheds
  • 2 picks of Yarn B in the same shed, beating between each pick, so that color B is doubled in the weft. Be sure to catch the thread at the selvedge when you throw the second pick so that you do not unweave the first pick.
  • 2 picks with Color A in alternating sheds.
  • Repeat these last two steps until you have 12 rows of Color B (doubled weft picks). Then weave only with Color A in alternating sheds until the towel reaches 22” total measured under tension on the loom. Weave with scrap yarn for about an 1" between each towel to leave room for fringe.

3. After removing the yardage from the loom (and before cutting the towels apart) use a sewing machine to straight stitch the ends of each towel, making sure to back-stitch the first few and last few stitches to secure the edges of the hem. The stitching should be about 1/2" from the scrap yarn marker on either side. Cut the towels apart at the scrap yarn marker, leaving a short fringe on either side. Machine wash cold on delicate and air dry (or tumble dry low if preferred). Press as needed. If you chose to hemstitch the edges, cut apart the napkins at the center of the 1" space left for fringe, then wash.

About Christine Jablonski

In addition to being GIST's Operations Manager and Wholesale Director, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram

November 20, 2020 — Christine Jablonski

Mixed Twill Scarf

Mixed Twill Scarf

Inspired by traditional twill samplers, this scarf combines point twill, balanced twill, and broken twill for a bold visual effect. The slub texture of Mallo softens the linear pattern, as if it were drawn by hand. 

You can download an updated version of this pattern and purchase a kit here.

Designed by Elizabeth Springett for Gist Yarn.

Yarn

Warp: 1 cone of Mallo Cotton Slub in Natural (1/2 lb cone, 1500 yds/lb), approximately 603 yards required

Weft: 1 cone of Mallo Cotton Slub in Coal (1/2 lb cone, 1500 yds/lb), approximately 424 yards required

Equipment

Loom: 4 shaft table or floor loom at least 18" wide

Reed: 8 dent reed sleyed 1-2-2-2, or 12 dent reed sleyed 1-1-1-1-1-2

Shuttles: 1

Bobbins: 1

Other: Fringe twister (optional)

Specifications

Technique: Twill

EPI: 14  

PPI: 14  

Width at Reed: ~15.5"

Warp Ends: 218 (includes 2 floating selvedges)

Warp Length: 2.79 yards (100.5"), includes 30" for loom waste and shrinkage 

Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 70.5" 

Finishing: Hemstitch, hand wash in cold water and lay flat to dry, trim fringe to 2.5" 

Finished Size: 15" W x 65" L + 2.5" fringe on each side 

Care: Hand or machine wash cold delicate cycle, lay flat to dry

Instructions

Color A - Mallo Cotton Slub in Natural

Color B - Mallo Cotton Slub in Coal

1. Wind a warp using Color A with 216 ends, 2.79 yards long. Dress the loom using your preferred method. 

2. Thread according to the draft. Sley 1-2-2-2 in an 8 dent reed or 1-1-1-1-1-2 in a 12 dent reed, centering for a weaving width of ~15.5". Add a floating selvedge on both sides for a total of 218 warp ends. 

3. Using Color B, begin and end the scarf with 1/2" of plain weave and hemstitch. Treadle according to the draft until the scarf measures approximately 70.5" in loom. 

4. Hand wash in cold water and lay flat to dry. Trim fringe to 2.5" on each side.

About Elizabeth Springett

Elizabeth Springett is the CEO and CCG (Creative Color Guru) at WovenSeas Weaving Studio in Norwood MA. Elizabeth states often how she loves to weave but in fact what her real passion is is the technical design and color work it takes to create cloth. Specializing in utilitarian cloths such as towels, placemats, and rugs, all of natural fibers, Elizabeth sells her wares on her website. Twenty years in the apparel and home fashion industries designing and coloring fabrics offers many tips and tools for teaching new weavers how to weave. As Elizabeth bikes along Rhode Island's East Bay Bike Path, she sees inspiration in the beautiful land, sea and sky. 

October 23, 2020 — Elizabeth Springett

Basketweave Rug by Christine Jablonski

Basketweave Rug

A wool accent rug woven with a basketweave texture on a rigid heddle loom. This project uses pick-up sticks and a heddle rod with string heddles to create weft floats with two contrasting colors of Mountain Meadow Wool yarn.

Designed and woven by Christine Jablonski for GIST: Yarn & Fiber

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 1 cone 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton in Light Gray, 2 skeins of Rug/Tapestry Wool in Lupine, 1 skein of Rug/Tapestry Wool in Sorrel

Kits: Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave a rug that measures approximately 19.5” x 36” (including fringe) after washing.

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: Rigid heddle loom at least 28" wide, 7.5 or 8 dent reed, 2 boat shuttles & bobbins or 2 stick shuttles, 2 pick-up sticks, 1 heddle rod with 26 string heddles
  • EPI: 7.5
  • PPI: ~13 in pattern
  • Width at Reed: 27.75" 
  • Warp Ends: 208
  • Warp Length: 2 yards, includes ~40” weaving length, 2” for fringe and 30” for loom waste and sampling
  • Draft/Technique: Basketweave, pick-up stick and heddle rod weft floats        
  • Total warp yarn used: 416 yards 8/8 un-mercerized cotton
  • Total weft yarn used: 11 yards 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton for tabby and hemstitch, 280 yards Main Color Wool, 137 yards Contrast Color Wool
  • Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): ~40"
  • Take-up and Shrinkage: 39% width, 16% length
  • Finished Dimensions: 19.5” x 36” (34” weaving + 1” fringe each side)
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch, 1” fringe on each side 
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold, lay flat to dry

Getting Started

Warp the loom with 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton using your preferred method (direct or indirect) with a total of 208 warp ends, 2 yards long. Center for a weaving width of 28" and sley 1 end per hole and slot in a 7.5 dent heddle on a rigid heddle loom.

Pick up the floats

  • Place the heddle into the “down” position. Behind the heddle, only the slot threads are up. Place a long piece of cardboard, like a section of manila file folder under the raised threads to help you see which threads to pick up.
  • Using one pickup stick (stick A), pick up the first slot thread, leave the next 2 down, pick up the next 2 slot threads. Photo 1 Continue in this manner of 2 down/2 up all the way across, until the last three threads: 2 down/1 up. Slide stick A to the back of the loom.
  • Insert a second pickup stick (Christine’s is a yardstick, stick B) in front of stick A and pick up the opposite thread pattern (first thread is down, continue 2 up/2 down pattern all the way across to the last three threads: 2 up/1 down). Photo 2

1

2

  • Turn stick B on it’s side and loop string heddles under all the “B” warp threads and then onto a heddle rod (click here for information about how to make string heddles). Remove stick “B.” All of the “A” warp threads remain on stick “A,” all of the “B” warp threads are now attached to the heddle rod with the string heddles. Photos 3, 4 & 5

3

4

5

6

Pattern Sequences

Each of these 4-pick sequences creates one row of color. The sequences are offset from each other and create a basketweave-like texture when woven ABABA and so on. (Photo 6)

Sequence A

Picks 1-3: heddle is NEUTRAL, pick up stick A turned on edge behind heddle 

*note: even though the heddle rod is resting on top of the “A” warp threads it does not interfere with the pattern because the “B” warp threads are not under tension. Be sure to catch the edge thread at the beginning of each weft pick, and beat in between each pick even though they are in the same shed.

Pick 4: heddle is UP

Sequence B

Picks 5-7: heddle is NEUTRAL, raise heddle rod *note: place a pick up stick on edge under the warp threads raised by the heddle rod so both hands are free to pass the shuttle. Be sure to catch the edge thread at the beginning of each weft pick, and beat in between each pick even though they are in the same shed.

Pick 8: heddle is UP

Weaving & Finishing

Leave at least 1” of warp for fringe on each end, Begin and end the rug with 4 picks of tabby with the 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton, then hemstitch in groups of 2 warp and 4 weft threads. 

To create the graduated color rows at each end of the rug, begin with your Main Color then alternate with your Contrasting Color in the following manner:

  • MC: 1x pattern sequence A (makes one row of Lupine)
  • CC: 1x pattern sequence B (makes one row of Sorrell)
  • MC: 1x pattern sequence A (makes one row of Lupine)
  • CC: 1x pattern sequence B, 1x pattern sequence A (makes two rows of Sorrell)
  • MC: 1x sequence B (makes one row of Lupine)
  • CC: 1x sequence B, 1x sequence A, 1x sequence B (makes three rows of Sorrell)

Continue with alternating one row of Main Color (Lupine) with an increasing number of Contrast Color (Sorrell) stripes until you weave 6 Contrast Color (Sorrell) rows, then:

  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 1 row Contrast Color (Sorrell)
  • 76 rows Main Color (Lupine)
  • Then mirror the border sequence:
  • 1 row Contrast Color (Sorrell)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 6 rows Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 5 rows Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 4 rows Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 3 rows Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 2 rows Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)
  • 1 row Contrast Color (Sorrel)
  • 1 row Main Color (Lupine)

**remember each row = 4 pattern picks

Finish the rug with four picks of tabby in the 8/8 Un-Mercerized Cotton warp yarn, hemstitching groups of two warp and four weft threads. Leave at least 1” of fringe at this end.

Cut yardage off the loom. Hand wash in cold water and lay flat to dry. Trim fringe to 1” each end. 

About Christine Jablonski

In addition to being GIST's Operations Manager and Wholesale Director, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram



October 02, 2020 — Christine Jablonski

Gosling Pillows Weave-Along with Arianna E. Funk

Day 1~ Warp/Draw-on

Welcome to the Gosling Pillows Weave-Along with Arianna E. Funk!

Arianna will be giving us some insight into the Swedish way of dressing the loom, which she covered very extensively during the Halvdräll Towels Weave-Along.

To see more of Arianna's weaving process and previous Weave-Along, visit her Instagram and look for story highlights (pictured here). 

                     
                     

Winding the Warp

                     
                     

Arianna is using Gosling Pillows Kit ~ 2 for this Weave-Along.

Pre-Sley

I prefer pre-sleying because I would rather sley twice than tie on twice! But it's really just a matter of how you learned and how your brain works, of course. I also like that it is easy to combine different warp chains for more complicated patterning without having to sacrifice efficiency in warping.

You can see more about this process on Arianna's Instagram story highlights or IGTV.

                     
                     

Beaming On!

Normally I would use my jack but this warp is so short that I'm going to cheat and just hang weights from my two chains over the front beam.

                     
                     
                    
                     

The weights I use are from my damask extension -- they are maybe lead? Super heavy: 1475 g (3 lb 4 oz) each! 

It's good if the weights are really heavy, since the more taut the warp ends are while beaming on, the easier it is to feel discrepancies in tension. But it's even more important that they are equally heavy, otherwise you may have tension issues. 

Some other ideas of what to use: free weights, two jugs with handles filled with equal amounts of water, cinderblocks...it's good if they can be easily attached/tied on and removed.

Ready to Thread


Day 2 ~ Thread, Sley, Tie-on, Tie-up

Threading

                    
                    

I don't count my heddles, instead I put a bunch on the right-hand side of the chains down to my lams, and since I have two warp chains and I know exactly where the middle is, I can just thread all of the ends from the right half and then shift the leftover heddles to the left side. 

Give yourself plenty of space while you thread, you can always move the heddles around afterward! 

A closer look...

Sleying the Reed

                     
                     

I hang my reed in a heddle that is only attached to the top of the shaft. The bottom loom fits my reed perfectly and it doesn't squiggle around while I'm sleying.

Tie-on/Tie-up

Tension looks pretty even if you ask me!

                     
                     

Pro tip: number your lams! Doesn't have to be numbers if that's confusing, it can be letters, shapes, symbols...stickers? Anything that will tell you which loops/holes go together. Saves so much brain power when you're tying-up!

This is my face when I remember I've got my halvdräll tie-up from my last project still in place and don't have to change a thing!


Day 3 ~ Butterflies, Rya Knots, Weaving Pillow A

Making Butterflies

                     
                     

Gosling Pillows Kit ~ 2 uses Mallo in Spice and Duet in Sun as the weft. 

I've printed out the chart from the pattern and written in my colors to keep everything in order.

Getting Started

                     
                     

I'm using Mallo in Spice as the tabby weft. You will notice the weft pulls in like crazy! Don't worry, I've accounted for that in the measurements and you just need "ice in your belly" as we say in Swedish.

Rya Knots

                     
                     

Errata: there are actually only 26 ends on the right side, not 28! But that won't make a difference when sewing the pillow.

Halfway there!

Finishing Pillow 1

                     
                     

In the photo on the left you can see that we are halfway there and beginning to add the yellow back in. 

Once you have finished weaving the first pillow, weave 1 contrasting pick to give you a clear line of where to zig zag or serge.


Day 4 ~ Weaving Pillow B

                     
                     

Weaving Pillow B today, which uses Duet as the tabby weft. I'm using Sun

Pro tip: make yourself a little tool belt to hold your scissors! Rya requires a ton of cutting and I was always leaving my scissors at the loom when I needed them at the butterfly station, and vice versa.

Cutting the rya loops! You can leave them as loops and cut them all at the end or clip as you go--just don't clip any warp ends...

                     
                     

Anyone else's selvedges look like this? It's partly due to the fact that the edges don't have any knots and will bind somewhat more loosely the whole way. It will disappear in the wash AND in the seam allowance--weaving pillows is nice like that!

Also, don't worry too much about the length of your loops. Don't make them too long, or you risk running out of material, but loops of different sizes give the pile a more dynamic energy.

Finishing

                     
                     

At the end of the second pillow, throw another contrasting pick and then weave another 1/2" or 1 cm so that you have a nice crisp line when you cut down and are ready to zig zag or serge.

Once the fabric is off the loom, zig zag or serge the raw edges of your pillows. Then give them a wash. I  washed by hand used a gentle, PH-neutral wool wash.


Day 5 ~ Sewing the Pillows

Pillows are dry and ready to sew!

                     
                     

This is why I kept nagging about yarn waste--this is all I have left after weaving the pillows! And a few inches of thrums.

Pillow A I left as loops, even through washing. For Pillow B I cut the loops. I think the pile behaves better when you cut it before washing, and the ends fray ever so slightly in a really nice way.

                     
                     

Choosing a backing fabric! This is hand-dyed linen.

I like to pull out one thread on each edge of the rectangle I'm going to cut so that I've got a nice sharp edge and it's easy to cut squarely. Don't be fooled/worried, I'm not this nit-picky about everything...but I like to sew with the backing as a guide, so I want these to be exact.

                     
                     

My pieces ended up being 54 x 50 cm (21.25" x 19.5") after hand washing, but I was able to stretch it gently widthwise to get a piece that was 52 x 51cm (20.5" x 20"). I've found that it's okay if the pillowcase is slightly smaller than 20" x 20", it's  not really noticeable.

In the photo on the right you can see that I've started hemming the back pieces. 

                     
                     

Here you can see that the pillow front is slightly longer than necessary. You can zig zag and cut it off or (like me) let it be!

It might not be very clear here but remember to put the "top" backing piece down first, since we will be turning this inside out when finished.

Pro tip (that you should really look up on the internet or ask your favorite sewist): sew maybe 1 cm (5/8") or so in at the corner to avoid those super pointy corners once you've put the case on the pillow. It seems so counterintuitive but it really works! 

As you can see, I went a little overboard, but I leaned into it and they still look great.

The Finished Pillows

                     
                     

Here they are! Thanks for a great week, I can't wait to see what you make!

If you would like to share your photos, you can email us or use #goslingweavealong on Instagram.


September 14, 2020 — Arianna E. Funk

Deflected Doubleweave Scarf

Deflected Doubleweave Scarf

A straightforward approach to deflected doubleweave using 4 harnesses and 2 colors of Duet Cotton/Linen. This scarf has a reversible pattern that can be as bold or understated as you want it to be, depending on the colors in the warp and weft.

Designed and woven by Elizabeth Springett for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 2 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen (1/4 lb cones, 2,390 yd/lb) in contrasting colors, shown here in Marble and Chambray

Kits: Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave 1 scarf that measures approximately 11.5" wide x 68" long with fringe.

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom at least 15" wide, 8 dent reed, 2 boat shuttles & bobbins
  • EPI: 16
  • PPI: 14
  • Width at Reed: 12.84" 
  • Warp Ends: 206
  • Warp Length: 2.75 yards (99.5"), includes 30.5" to account for shrinkage and loom waste
  • Draft: Deflected Doubleweave    
  • Total warp yarn used: ~567 yards (346.5 yards Marble, 220 yards Chambray)
  • Total weft yarn used: ~390 yards (234 yards Marble, 156 yards Chambray)
  • Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 75.5"
  • Finished Dimensions: 1 scarf that measures approximately 11.5" wide x 68" long with fringe
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch, 2" fringe on each side
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash in cold water, hang to dry

Instructions

1. Wind a warp with 206 ends, 2.75 yards long following the warp color order on the draft below. Warp the loom using your preferred method.

2. Thread according to the draft below. Sley 2 ends per dent in an 8 dent reed for an epi of 16, centering for a weaving width of 12.84".

3. Begin and end the scarf with hemstitch. Weave according to the draft below until the scarf measures approximately 75.5" in loom. Make sure to carry the inactive weft along the selvedge when switching colors.

4. Hand wash in cold water, hang to dry. Trim fringe to 2" on each side. 

About Elizabeth Springett

Elizabeth Springett is the CEO and CCG (Creative Color Guru) at WovenSeas Weaving Studio in Norwood MA. Elizabeth states often how she loves to weave but in fact what her real passion is is the technical design and color work it takes to create cloth. Specializing in utilitarian cloths such as towels, placemats, and rugs, all of natural fibers, Elizabeth sells her wares on her website. Twenty years in the apparel and home fashion industries designing and coloring fabrics offers many tips and tools for teaching new weavers how to weave. As Elizabeth bikes along Rhode Island's East Bay Bike Path, she sees inspiration in the beautiful land, sea and sky. 



September 04, 2020 — Elizabeth Springett

Running Stitch Napkins

Free Rigid Heddle Weaving Pattern Color and Weave Napkins

Running Stitch Napkins

A timeless set of napkins to add to your table linens collection, woven with Duet in two contrasting hues. Color-and-weave is used here to create a pattern reminiscent of hand-stitched or quilted fabrics.

Designed and woven by Christine Jablonski for GIST: Yarn & Fiber

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers

Free Rigid Heddle Weaving Pattern Color and Weave Napkins

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 2 cones of Duet Cotton/Linen (1/4 lb cones, 2,390 yd/lb) in contrasting colors, shown here in Dusk and Chambray

Kits: Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave a set of 4 napkins that measure ~8" W x 8" L after washing. You will have yarn remaining to make more napkins, or to use in future projects.

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: Rigid heddle loom at least 10" wide, 12 or 12.5 dent reed, 2 boat shuttles & bobbins or 2 stick shuttles
  • EPI: 12 
  • PPI: ~12
  • Width at Reed: 9" 
  • Warp Ends: 120 (note: some ends are doubled, reducing the width at reed)
  • Warp Length: 2 yards, includes 36" for loom waste and sampling
  • Draft: Tabby (plain weave), color-and-weave        
  • Total warp yarn used: ~240 yards
  • Total weft yarn used: ~108 yards
  • Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 9" per napkin
  • Finished Dimensions: 4 napkins that measure ~8" W x 8" L each after washing
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch, or machine stitched hem with frayed edge         
  • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold on delicate cycle, air dry or tumble dry low, press as needed

Instructions

1. Warp the loom using your preferred method (direct or indirect) with a total of 120 warp ends, 2 yards long, following the warp color order below. Center for a weaving width of 9" and sley as follows:

  • 2 ends of Color A sleyed with a single thread per hole and slot
  • 2 ends of Color B (held together as one) sleyed with both threads in the same hole or slot

Repeat these steps 10 more times. There will be 11 stripes (22 ends, since Color B is doubled) of Color B in the warp

  • 76 ends of Color A.  

2. Begin and end each napkin with hemstich, if that is your preferred method. You can also machine stitch each edge when you have finished weaving (as pictured). Weave following the color order below.

  • 4 picks of Color A in alternating sheds 
  • 2 picks of Color B in the same shed, beating between each pick, so that color B is doubled in the weft. Be sure to catch the thread at the selvedge when you throw the second pick so that you do not unweave the first pick.
  • 2 picks of Color A in alternating sheds

Repeat these last two steps until you have 10 rows of Color B (doubled picks). Then weave with Color A in alternating sheds until the napkin measures 9" in loom. Weave with scrap yarn for about an 1" between each napkin to leave room for fringe.

3. After removing the yardage from the loom (and before cutting the napkins apart) use a sewing machine to straight stitch the ends of each napkin, making sure to back-stitch the first few and last few stitches to secure the edges of the hem. The stitching should be about 1/2" from the scrap yarn marker on either side. Cut the napkins apart at the scrap yarn marker, leaving a short fringe on either side. Machine wash cold on delicate and air dry (or tumble dry low if preferred). Press as needed. If you chose to hemstitch the edges, cut apart the napkins at the center of the 1" space left for fringe, then wash.

Free Rigid Heddle Weaving Pattern Color and Weave Napkins

About Christine Jablonski

In addition to being GIST's Operations Manager and Wholesale Director, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram



August 14, 2020 — Christine Jablonski

Color-and-Weave Towels

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

Color-and-Weave Towels

Color-and-Weave is a simple plain weave technique that utilizes a specific color order in the warp and weft to create a seemingly intricate pattern. These towels are woven with Mallo Cotton Slub in two contrasting shades of blue.

Pattern by Jenny Sennott, woven by Elizabeth Springett for GIST: Yarn & Fiber

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 2 cones of Mallo Cotton Slub (1/2 lb cones, 1,500 yd/lb) in contrasting colors, shown here in Icicle and Eclipse

Kits: Each kit includes plenty of yarn to weave a set of 2 towels that measure ~16" W x 31.5" L after washing and hemming.

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: Rigid heddle loom at least 20" wide, or 2-4 shaft table or floor loom, 12 or 12.5 dent reed, 2 boat shuttles & bobbins or 2 stick shuttles
  • EPI: 12 
  • PPI: ~12
  • Width at Reed: 18" 
  • Warp Ends: 216
  • Warp Length: 2.8 yards (100"), includes 24" of loom waste and 20% for shrinkage
  • Draft: Tabby (plain weave), color-and-weave        
  • Total warp yarn used: ~608 yards
  • Total weft yarn used: ~670 yards
  • Woven Length (measured under tension on the loom): 35"
  • Finished Dimensions: 2 towels that measure ~16" W x 31.5" L each after washing and hemming
  • Finishing Details: Hand sewn rolled hem         
  • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold, tumble dry low, press as needed

Instructions

1. Warp the loom using your preferred method (direct or indirect) with a total of 216 warp ends, 2.8 yards long, following the warp color order below. Center for a weaving width of 18" and sley 1 end per hole and slot in a 12 or 12.5 dent heddle on a rigid heddle loom. If you are using a multi-shaft loom, thread for plain weave and sley 1 end per dent in a 12 dent reed. 

Warp Color Order: D D D L D D D L L L L (19 repeats, 209 ends), end with D D D L D D D for a total of 216 ends

2. Weave following the weft color order below. Each towel should measure approximately 35” long in loom to account for shrinkage and hems. Weave with scrap yarn for a few picks in between each towel. 

Weft Color Order: D D D L D L D L 

3. Cut the fabric off the loom and zig zag the raw edges. Machine wash cold and tumble dry low. Cut the towels apart at scrap yarn maker. Turn edges 1/4” twice for rolled hems, and press. Stitch hems by hand or by machine.

Rigid Heddle Color and Weave Towels

About Jenny Sennott

Jenny Sennott is a weaver and weaving teacher in mid-Missouri. Her favorite source of inspiration for her weaving is the world of nature. She has taught weaving to people of all ages and abilities for over 30 years at Access Arts in Columbia, MO, and is continually inspired by the weaving explorations of her students.



July 23, 2020 — Jenny Sennott

Free Pattern to Weave these Silk Noil Neck Scarves

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Flourish Silk Noil Neck Scarves

*Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

Soft, textured, and oh so simple. These elegant silk noil neck scarves by Emma Rhodes are designed to be woven on a floor loom OR a rigid heddle loom. Our Treenway 10/2 Undyed Silk Noil and Japanese Silk Noil yarns weave together beautifully and become even softer after washing and wearing. Whip up this silky duo over the weekend and wear them on your neck, wrist, hair, or purse. Below you will find all the instructions and materials needed to make a pair of neck ties to complement your wardrobe. 

Materials 

Warp: 1 skein of un-dyed Treenway 10/2 Silk Noil

Weft: 2 cones of Japanese Silk Noil 

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern

Project Notes

  • Tools required: 2-4 shaft loom or rigid heddle loom12 dent reedboat shuttle or stick shuttle
  • Structure: Plain weave 
  • EPI: 12 
  • Width at reed: 4.5"
  • Warp ends: 56
  • Warp length: ~113" (3.1 yards) 
  • Length measured under tension at loom: Each scarf should measure about 40-43" under tension. Make sure to weave about 1/2" - 1" with scrap yarn at the beginning and end of each scarf for spacing. 
  • Finished dimensions: 2 neck scarves that measure approximately 4" wide by 36-40" long (depending on personal preference) 
  • Finishing details: Machine stitched frayed edge (or hand stitched if you prefer)
  • Care instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent and air dry, press and steam as needed
                 
                 

Pattern & Sewing Instructions 

Emma writes: "Weave each scarf to about 43" under tension (and make sure to weave with scrap yarn for 1/2"-1" at the beginning and the end of each). I chose to make each a solid color but you can also experiment with stripes and color blocks. Once you have finished weaving follow these finishing instructions and reference the photos below:

  1. Cut scarves apart in the center of the scrap yarn spacer. 
  2. Fold one end over on the diagonal so that it creates a triangle. I lined up the edge of the scarf with the selvedge to make sure it was square. 
  3. Cut along the crease to create a raw diagonal edge.
  4. Set up your sewing machine for a fairly small stitch. I set mine to about a 4 on the dial and adjusted the tension accordingly. Do some tests on the scraps of fabric cut from the ends of the scarf.
  5. Line up your raw edge on the 3/8" hem line on your sewing machine. Straight stitch down the diagonal edge. Use back stitch at the beginning and end to secure the stitches. 
  6. Trim the raw edge a bit closer to the stitched line and fluff the fringe a bit to bring out the frayed edge. The stitches are hardly noticeable. Repeat on each edge for both scarves. 
  7. Wash and air dry your scarves. Press with a warm iron and lots of steam. I found that washing and ironing made a huge difference in the softness of the fabric."
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
     
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
   
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                
Silk Noil Neck Scarves Free Weaving Pattern
                 
July 22, 2020 — Emma Rhodes

Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Brooks Bouquet Curtains 

*Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

Weave an elegant pair of curtains designed by Erin Supinski for her Brooklyn home. These curtains are woven with a few of our favorite undyed yarns including Silk / Ramie10/2 Silk Noil, and Fine Paper Weaving Yarn. The light, airy texture is complemented by Brooks Bouquet detailing and filters light beautifully. 

Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

Materials 

This pattern is designed to weave a pair of curtains that measure 35.5" W x 69" L. If your windows are similar in size we recommend purchasing one kit. If your windows are considerably larger or you would like to make multiple pairs, we recommend purchasing two kits.



Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     
Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 2-4 shaft loom12 dent reedshuttle & bobbins
  • EPI: 16 (threaded in a 12 dent reed 2-1-1-2-1-1)
  • Width at Reed: 39.625" 
  • Warp Ends: 634
  • Warp Length: 8 yards
  • Length on the Loom: Approximately 200" (100" each panel to account for shrinkage and hemming) 
  • PPI: 16
  • Draft: Plain Weave 
  •  Finishing Details: Wet finished and sewn into 2 panels that measure approximately 69" L x 35.5" W with a doubled 5" bottom hem and a doubled 1 1/2" rod pocket. Each panel measures about 83" before cutting and hemming.
  •  Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, air dry, steam or iron on lowest setting as needed.
  • Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         
    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains
                         

    Weaving and Finishing

    Erin writes, "I wanted to make sheer, airy curtains focusing on the textures of the different yarns, so I sett my project loosely, and in the warp I alternated big stripes of the UKI cotton (five stripes) and the Brassard cotton (six stripes) at 54 ends each. In between these thicker stripes I alternated thin stripes of four ends each of the silk/ramie and silk noil, for a total of 10 skinny stripes (five stripes of each). I made sure to have enough yarn in the warp to do a sample in order to try different techniques and to calculate shrinkage after washing." 

    Yarn A = UKI 8/2 Un-mercerized Cotton Weaving Yarn

    Yarn B = 8/2 Un-mercerized Brassard Weaving Yarn

    Yarn C = Silk / Ramie Weaving Yarn

    Yarn D = 10/2 Silk Noil Weaving Yarn

    Yarn E = White Fine Paper Weaving Yarn 

    Wind a warp repeating the following sequence 5 times, and then wind 54 ends of Yarn A, for a total of 634 warp ends: 

    • 54 ends of Yarn A 
    • 4 ends of Yarn C
    • 54 ends of Yarn B 
    • 4 ends of Yarn D

    "For the weft I again alternated the wider stripes, 51 picks each at 16 ppi, of the UKI and Brassard, and I added in a wide stripe of the fine paper. In between the UKI and Brassard I did a skinny stripe of the silk/ramie, and on either side of the paper yarn I did a stripe of the silk noil. Each skinny stripe was 4 picks each. The overall effect was a windowpane plaid in different textures of yarn." 

    Repeat the following sequence for each panel: 

    • 51 picks of Yarn A
    • 4 picks Yarn C
    • 51 picks Yarn B 
    • 4 picks Yarn D
    • 51 picks Yarn E
    • 4 picks Yarn D

    "I randomly chose some of the wider stripes and inlaid some brooks bouquet. I wove three picks in the stripe then went four ends into each stripe, wrapped around the next five ends, wove the the next five, wrapped the next five and so on until there were four ends left, and then I wove the rest of the row. Then I wove four picks, and on the fifth pick I staggered the wraps, so I wove nine ends, wrapped five, wove five ends, wrapped five, and so on until there were nine ends left in the stripe. Then I wove the rest of the row. I repeated these on every fifth pick nine times for a total of 48 picks in the stripe, then I wove the last three picks (for a total of 51 in the stripe), and switched yarn for the skinny stripe. (The pictures I included may help clarify this a bit...)"

    For more information on Brooks Bouquet see this tutorial on the Schacht Spindle Company website. 

    "I made sure each panel was at least 100" long to account for shrinkage, and to give enough fabric to sew the hem and rod pocket, but I like to give myself extra wiggle room, so I wove an extra 15" overall, so I would have enough to make sure my stripes lined up across both panels.

    Then I cut the fabric off the loom, soaked it in the bathtub with some Woolite and warm water, and ironed it until it was dry. I then cut each panel to 83" making sure the stripes lined up as closely as possible. For the rod pockets I ironed the top down 1 1/2", and then I folded that down another 1 1/2", pressed, and sewed. For the hem, I pressed 5", then folded up another 5", pressed, and sewed. I like using double hems because it makes the curtains feel more substantial. Then I used a tension rod and hung them in my window—done!"

    Free Pattern to Weave a Pair of Brooks Bouquet Curtains

    About the Artist 

    Formally trained as a graphic designer and illustrator, Erin Supinski spends all of her free time weaving from her home studio in Brooklyn. Drawn to the tactility of weaving and primarily self-taught, she has been weaving since 2014. She loves to create items that are functional, simple, and beautiful out of natural materials.

    To see more of Erin's work and process check out her Instagram

    Erin Supinski Artist Bio
    July 22, 2020 — Erin Supinski

    Tencel Wave Scarf

    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     

    Wave Scarf 

    *Please note, we no longer carry this yarn, but you are welcome to use this pattern as inspiration!*

    Strong, washable, and super soft, this yarn is the perfect (and affordable) alternative to silk. Sarah designed this beautiful weaving project using three cones in complementing colors to create a soft gradient. Wind a warp long enough for three scarves and try weaving each scarf using a different weft color. This is a fun way to experiment with how different weft colors affect the same warp. See all the project details below and purchase a kit to get started! 

    Materials

    Warp & Weft: 3 cones of 8/2 weaving yarn

    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     

    Project Notes 

    • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, shuttle & bobbinsfringe twister 
    • EPI: 24
    • Width at Reed: 8"
    • Warp Ends: 192
    • Warp Length: 7.25 yards
    • Draft: 2/2 Twill (see draft below) and tabby
    • Finished Dimensions: 3 scarves that measure approximately 7" W x 68" L + 5" of fringe on each side
    • Finishing Details: Hemstitch, twisted fringe
    • Care Instructions: Machine wash cold & tumble dry low, iron to bring out the shine
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf
                     
    Free Pattern to Weave this Tencel Wave Scarf

    Pattern

    In the photos above, Color A is Silver (lightest color), Color B is Sage (medium color), and Color C is Lime Green (darkest color)

    Warp Color Order: Warp the following pattern for a total of 192 warp ends.

    12A - 1B - 5A - 2B - 4A - 1C - 1B - 2A - 4B - 2C - 4A - 3B - 1C - 4A - 3B - 1C - 4B - 6A - 4B - 2C - 4B - 2A - 8B - 2C - 2A - 2C - 8B - 6C - 6B - 2A - 8B - 8C - 4B - 2A - 4C - 4B - 6C - 2B - 2A - 10C - 4B - 8C - 4A - 2B - 8C - 2B - 6C

    Weft Color Order: Weave scarf 1 with Color A as the weft, scarf 2 with Color B as the weft, and scarf 3 with Color C as the weft. Begin and end each scarf with hemstitch and leave 12" of space between scarves for fringe. Alternate between twill (see draft) and tabby on each scarf, following this sequence:

    • 4" of twill 
    • 64" tabby 
    • 4" twill 

    Finishing: Cut the scarves apart leaving 6" of fringe on each side. Machine wash and tumble dry low. (If you did not hemstitch, make sure to secure the edges first!) Press with a warm iron to bring out the shine. Twist fringe and trim to about 5" on each side. 

    About Sarah Resnick

    Sarah Resnick is the founder of GIST: Yarn & Fiber, and the host of the Weave podcast. She learned how to weave in Toronto in 2009, and was hauling a Craigslist loom up to her apartment two months later...she's never looked back since! Other parts of her fiber journey included selling handwoven baby wraps, helping to launch a sewing factory in Fall River, Massachusetts, and creating Jewish ritual textiles for people celebrating life cycle events. The thread that winds through everything she does is a passion for building systems that directly support farmers, manufacturers, and artists to bring value and beauty into the world. 

    Sarah Resnick
    July 22, 2020 — Sarah Resnick