Episode 76: Contextualizing Textiles Part Two with LaChaun Moore

by LaChaun Moore

This week on the podcast LaChaun is talking about her progress growing naturally colored cotton and indigo suffruticosa in Low Country South Carolina. She also introduces a new segment that will incorporate listeners in her quest to dig deeper into the world of weaving and textiles.

LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
Creative Commons License

The music for this podcast  is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseThe musical section is an excerpt of the original: The Beauty of Maths by Meydän.



6 Responses

Melvenea R Hodges of Traditions in Cloth LLC.
Melvenea R Hodges of Traditions in Cloth LLC.

December 12, 2020

I am so excited about your journey, especially with cotton and indigo. I saw the picture of your gourds and immediately saw them as spindle bowls for use with spinning cotton as it was traditionally done with clay beads. I hope you continue to share your experience. This is truly inspiring.

스포츠토토
스포츠토토

November 04, 2020

very good written article. It will be a good support to anyone who utilizes it including me. Keep doing what you are doing can’t wait to read more posts very nice article 스포츠토토

Henrietta SHELBY
Henrietta SHELBY

March 09, 2020

I listened to both your episodes. Awesome statements. The artist, you know, are the healers. You are that. Thank you for sharing your story and best wishes on your farm. I will have to follow you on Instagram.

Lindy
Lindy

December 18, 2019

Thank you for this episode and for sharing your insights and experiences; the challenges and the rewards. It all resonates with me….

LaChaun Moore
LaChaun Moore

August 28, 2019

Hey Ashley,

I believe you are referring to Persicaria Tinctoria (Japanese Indigo). Japanese indigo is not frost hardy so it will not survive a winter frost past 50-degree weather. But it does better in the cold than the tropical variety that I grow Indigo Succfruticosa. The link above “Fibershed’s Indigo Processing Information” will tell you all about the plant from sourcing seeds or starts as well as how to extract the dye from the plant.

A variety for colder climates is Woad (Isatis tinctoria), in two weeks we will have an interview with a natural dyer in Norfolk, England where that variety is very popular and has a long history. Woad is known to be a cold-hardy variety for zones 5&6. So if you are interested in learning more tune in!

I hope that helps, Feel free to email me at: lachaun@gistyarn.com if you have any further questions!

Ashley West
Ashley West

August 26, 2019

I was listening to the episode while driving and missed the name of the northern, cold hardy indigo species you mentioned. Can you give me the name again?

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