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This week on the podcast LaChaun is talking about her progress growing naturally colored cotton and indigo suffruticosa in Low Country South Carolina. She also introduces a new segment that will incorporate listeners in her quest to dig deeper into the world of weaving and textiles.

From LaChaun: Are you interested in contributing some insights or words of wisdom to our podcast audience? Do you want to write in an email letter that can be shared with our listeners? Do you want to share an audio clip to be added to our episode? If so, I would love to hear from you. Please send an email to the lachaun@gistyarn.com. If you are interested in sending in an audio clip, you can record an audio file from a smart phone and email it in, or use this site to record and send it in.  I look forward to hearing from you! 

LaChaun's Email : lachaun@gistyarn.com 

LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
LaChaun Moore, Tannin Fiber Project
Creative Commons License

The music for this podcast  is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseThe musical section is an excerpt of the original: The Beauty of Maths by Meydän.

August 25, 2019 —

Comments

Melissa

Melissa said:

On the gistyarn dot com website an incorrect link to podcast #76 exists. Instead of linking to #76, it links to #77. Hope this can be fixed. Your podcasts are excellent!

LaChaun Moore

LaChaun Moore said:

Hey Ashley,

I believe you are referring to Persicaria Tinctoria (Japanese Indigo). Japanese indigo is not frost hardy so it will not survive a winter frost past 50-degree weather. But it does better in the cold than the tropical variety that I grow Indigo Succfruticosa. The link above “Fibershed’s Indigo Processing Information” will tell you all about the plant from sourcing seeds or starts as well as how to extract the dye from the plant.

A variety for colder climates is Woad (Isatis tinctoria), in two weeks we will have an interview with a natural dyer in Norfolk, England where that variety is very popular and has a long history. Woad is known to be a cold-hardy variety for zones 5&6. So if you are interested in learning more tune in!

I hope that helps, Feel free to email me at: lachaun@gistyarn.com if you have any further questions!

Ashley West

Ashley West said:

I was listening to the episode while driving and missed the name of the northern, cold hardy indigo species you mentioned. Can you give me the name again?

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