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Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Coastal Linen Tea Towels

A set of classic linen tea towels woven with 3 colors of 100% Linen Weaving Yarn using a Fibonacci stripe sequence and a point twill structure. 

Designed by Christine Jablonski for GIST: Yarn & Fiber.

Need some help getting started? Check out Resources for Beginner and Intermediate Weavers. 

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Materials 

Warp & Weft: 3 cones of 100% Linen Weaving Yarn

This pattern makes a set of 3 towels that measure approximately 13" W x 21" L each. You will have plenty of extra yarn to use in other projects, or to make more towels!

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, 10 dent reed, shuttle & bobbins 
  • EPI: 20 (2 ends per dent in a 10 dent reed)
  • PPI: 24 
  • Width at Reed: 14.5"
  • Warp Ends: 289
  • Warp Length: 3 yards
  • Technique: Point Twill
  • Takeup & Shrinkage: Approximately 10% on length and width
  • Finished Dimensions: A set of 3 towels that measure approximately 13" W x 21" L each 
  • Finishing Details: Hemstitch edge with 1/2" fringe or hand/machine sewn rolled hem
  • Care Instructions: Hand or machine wash cold on delicate cycle, lay flat to dry, press while still damp
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels
                     
Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels
                     

Weaving & Finishing

  • Color A = Copper (darkest color)
  • Color B = Oat (lightest color)
  • Color C = Arctic (medium color)

Warp Color Order: Christine used a Fibonacci sequence (groups of 3, 5, 8, & 13 Fibonacci units) broken by small strips of 1 unit. Each of these units represents one repeat of the 6-thread sequence of this point draft. See draft below.

*Optional: Christine used one thread of the edge color for a floating selvedge on each side. It is not necessary with a twill draft such as this, but it can help make the edges neater.

  • Color A: 30 ends 
  • Color B: 6 ends 
  • Color C: 48 ends 
  • Color A: 6 ends
  • Color B: 78 ends 
  • Color C: 6 ends
  • Color A: 18 ends 
  • Color B: 6 ends
  • Color C: 30 ends 
  • Color A: 6 ends
  • Color B: 48 ends 
  • Color C: 7 ends (6 ends for the repeat, plus 1 thread in shaft 1 to balance the pattern). 

Weft Color Order: As you wish! Christine wove one towel with Color A as the weft, the second with color B, and the third with Color C. 

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

Option 1: For a hemstitch edge with fringe: throw 3 picks of plain weave, hemstitch those three picks, weave 23" in pattern, finish with 3 picks of plain weave, hemstitch the end leaving 1/2" fringe on each side. Repeat this process at the beginning and end of each towel.

Option 2: For a rolled hem (machine stitched or hand sewn), weave 1" of plain weave with sewing thread (reduces bulk when the edge is rolled under and hemmed). Switch to linen, weave 23" in pattern. Switch back to sewing thread to weave 1" of plain weave. Repeat this process at the beginning and end of each towel. Zig zag raw edges using a sewing machine before washing. 

Finishing: Wet finish by hand washing or machine washing on delicate in cold water. Lay flat to dry, iron while damp. Roll zig-zagged edges under and hand or machine hem.

Variations 

The three cones of linen will give you enough yarn to make many warps, so experiment with changing up the color orders, or make one long warp to weave a beautiful runner and coordinating towels! (See weft stripe sampler below).

Free Weaving Pattern Striped Twill Fibonacci Linen Tea Towels

About Christine Jablonski 

In addition to being GIST's Studio & Wholesale Coordinator, Christine is a weaver and exhibiting fiber artist. She scampered down the rabbit hole of rigid heddle weaving several years ago as a way to use up her knitting stash and never looked back. In addition to very practical cloth woven to adorn home and body (tea towels are her favorite home linen projects to weave), Christine also weaves conceptual works that explore themes of mood and memory, strength and fragility, and often reflect on the current political and ecological landscape. Her work is held in private collections across the country and is shown regionally in New England galleries. To see more of Christine's work, check out her Instagram

Christine Jablonski
October 17, 2019 — Emma Rhodes