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Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

Clasped Weft Scarf

This timeless scarf design by Mariah Gaar is woven with a luxurious combination of silk and alpaca. Stripes are woven throughout the cloth using a technique called clasped weft, adding visual interest and accentuating the twill pattern. 

Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                     
Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                     

Materials 

Warp: 1 skein of 20/2 Bombyx Silk Yarn in White

Weft: 2 x 1/2 lb. cones of 3/10 Alpaca Weaving Yarn in contrasting colors (Mariah used cloud and black, see all color suggestions below)

Kits: Each kit contains enough yarn to weave one scarf that measures approximately 16" W x 76" L

Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

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Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

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Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

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Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                     
Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes
                     

Project Notes

  • Tools Required: 4 shaft table or floor loom, shuttle & bobbins, 10 or 15 dent reed
  • EPI: 15 *If using a 10 dent reed, thread (1,2,1,2,1,2)*
  • Width at Reed: 18" 
  • Warp Ends: 270
  • Warp Length: 3.3 yards
  • Draft: Birds Eye Twill 
  • Finished Dimensions: 16" W x 76" L 
  • Finishing Details: Hem stitch, 6" fringe 
  • Care Instructions: Hand wash cold with a mild detergent, lay flat to dry 

Weaving & Finishing 

Begin and end your scarf with hem stitch

Color A = Cloud, Color B = Black

Weft Color Order: Mariah writes, "When planning for this scarf I wanted to create something that felt balanced and carried the eye from one section to the next. I repeated and reflected a simple stripe layout in 6 sections that were 7" long. Each one of these sections were separated with 6" breaks. For each of the main sections: 2" of the primary weft was woven, 1/2" of the accent weft was woven (using the clasped weft technique), 2" of primary weft, 1/2" of accent weft (clasped), finally finishing this section with another 2" of the primary weft. For the separating breaks between the main pattern sections: 1/2" accent weft woven the entirety of the width, 5" of primary weft, then another 1/2" of accent weft.This can then be repeated as many times as desired or in smaller/greater lengths. Again, I repeated the main section 6 times with 5 of the 'breaks' in between."

Section 1

  • 2" Color A*
  • 1/2" Color B (clasped weft technique)
  • 2" Color A 
  • 1/2" Color B (clasped weft technique)
  • 2" Color A

Section 2 

  • 1/2" Color B (woven across full width) 
  • 5" Color A
  • 1/2" Color B (woven across full width) 
  • Repeat from * 

Repeat section 1 a total of 6 times and section 2 a total of 5 times for a total of about 72." 

Clasped Weft Technique: Mariah writes, "The clasped weft technique was used to create an eye-catching and impactful design while keeping the piece relatively minimal. To create this design you need two shuttles filled with the primary weft (used in the main body of the scarf) and your secondary weft (used as an accent). With the shed open slide your primary shuttle through -- wrapping it around your secondary shuttle's yarn so that it forms a loop around the accent weft. Pull the clasped accent yarn back into the open shed and position it where you like. Keeping it relatively loose -- close the shed and beat. Move on to the next sequence in your treadling and repeat." 

For a full tutorial on the clasped weft weaving technique, check out this post on the Bluprint website

Finishing: Once you have finished weaving, hand wash the scarf in cold water with a mild detergent and hang to dry. When the scarf is dry, iron or steam the fabric on the lowest setting and trim the fringe to the desired length. 

Free pattern to weave an alpaca and silk scarf with clasped weft stripes

About

I am from Missouri and graduated from College of the Ozarks in May 2018 where I majored in Studio Art -- emphasizing in Fibers and Graphic Design. I have always had a love for textiles and fondly remember my great grandmother making the most beautiful quilts -- she was always sewing and making and I like to think that textiles are in my bones. It wasn't till college that I really found my niche. I started learning to weave then and have been pursuing it ever since. 

To see more of Mariah's work, follow her on Instagram

Check out the Cozy Alpaca Throw project, also designed and woven by Mariah. 

Photography by Stacey Gaar. 

February 14, 2019 — Emma Rhodes

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