Farmhouse Napkins

  • A classic set of cotton/linen napkins for your next picnic. The stripes ripple and fade from one hue to another, inspired by sun-washed, heirloom table linens. Designed by Christine Jablonski.

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Farmhouse Napkins
$ 0.00 USD
Cone(s)
$ 41.00 USD
Cone(s)
$ 41.00 USD
Subtotal:
$ 82.00 USD

Customer Reviews

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Customer Reviews

Based on 26 reviews
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K
K.H.
Like Speedy Alka-Seltzer

Gist yarn and Fiber did a speedy job with their service; I received my order within a couple of days . Thank you

J
J.W.
Farmhouse Napkins

I wove this draft using a cotton/linen slub in cream and various shades of blue in the warp and an organic cotton weft. My warp was approximately 16 metres long which resulted in 18 beautiful tea towels. I have had such wonderful feedback from the recipients of these towels with several requests for more. It was an easy weave with very pleasing results, give it a try you won’t be disappointed I promise. Thanks GIST for your generosity of sharing this great draft.

L
L.A.
Inspiration Plus

Love their yarn and free patterns. Gist Yarn keeps me inspired everyday!

J
J.F.

Was easy to dress loom with this yarn. Haven't finished project yet, but have great confidence that it will weave up nicely.

K
K.D.
Quality yarns and patterns

I have only a rigid heddle loom, so I am constantly on the lookout for interesting drafts created for rigid heddle looms. I like to weave table linens and perhaps will some day weave some yardage for garments. After all, many fabrics in other parts of the world are only 22-24 inches wide. That is doable on my loom. I have worked with cotton, cotton/linen, wool, and cotton/wool yarns. My other weaving passion is making baby blankets. I have made them primarily from wool/nylon sock yarn because they are light weight, warm and washable -- very practical for a baby blanket. I am glad Gist Yarn & Fiber does not stock a gozillion yarns from all over the world. After all, the United States has many fiber producers and a great past in producing yarn and cloth. I am glad to see fiber production and cloth making being revived in our nation. I will and occasionally do purchase yarns produced in other countries, particularly from countries in which I have lived -- Spain and Turkey. I like your podcast, at least most of the episodes.